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Article: Access to adults’ hearing aids: policies and technologies used in eight countries

TitleAccess to adults’ hearing aids: policies and technologies used in eight countries
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherWorld Health Organization (WHO): Creative Commons Attribution. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.who.int/bulletin/en/
Citation
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 2019, v. 97, p. 699-710 How to Cite?
AbstractAs the proportion of older adults in the world’s total population continues to grow, the adverse health outcomes of age-related hearing loss are becoming increasingly recognized. While research has shown that age-related hearing loss is the single greatest modifiable risk factor for dementia, use of hearing aids remains low worldwide, even in many middle- and high-income countries. Reasons for poor uptake of hearing aids are likely to involve a combination of factors, ranging from increasing costs of hearing aid technology to a widespread lack of insurance coverage. This article aims to identify the current state of access to hearing aids, focusing on eight middle- and high-income countries. We discuss how to facilitate greater access to hearing aids for patients by addressing changes in how devices are regulated, technological advancements in hearing devices, the need to adjust reimbursement schemes and the importance of adaptation among the community workforce for hearing-care.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279243
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 6.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.819

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYong, M-
dc.contributor.authorWillink, A-
dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, C-
dc.contributor.authorMcPherson, DB-
dc.contributor.authorNieman, CL-
dc.contributor.authorReed, NS-
dc.contributor.authorLin, FR-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-23T02:38:24Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-23T02:38:24Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationBulletin of the World Health Organization, 2019, v. 97, p. 699-710-
dc.identifier.issn0042-9686-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279243-
dc.description.abstractAs the proportion of older adults in the world’s total population continues to grow, the adverse health outcomes of age-related hearing loss are becoming increasingly recognized. While research has shown that age-related hearing loss is the single greatest modifiable risk factor for dementia, use of hearing aids remains low worldwide, even in many middle- and high-income countries. Reasons for poor uptake of hearing aids are likely to involve a combination of factors, ranging from increasing costs of hearing aid technology to a widespread lack of insurance coverage. This article aims to identify the current state of access to hearing aids, focusing on eight middle- and high-income countries. We discuss how to facilitate greater access to hearing aids for patients by addressing changes in how devices are regulated, technological advancements in hearing devices, the need to adjust reimbursement schemes and the importance of adaptation among the community workforce for hearing-care.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWorld Health Organization (WHO): Creative Commons Attribution. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.who.int/bulletin/en/-
dc.relation.ispartofBulletin of the World Health Organization-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleAccess to adults’ hearing aids: policies and technologies used in eight countries-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailMcPherson, DB: dbmcpher@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMcPherson, DB=rp00937-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.2471/BLT.18.228676-
dc.identifier.hkuros307266-
dc.identifier.volume97-
dc.identifier.spage699-
dc.identifier.epage710-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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