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Article: Relationship Between Media Multitasking and Self-esteem Among Chinese Adolescents: Mediating Roles of Peer Influence and Family Functioning

TitleRelationship Between Media Multitasking and Self-esteem Among Chinese Adolescents: Mediating Roles of Peer Influence and Family Functioning
Authors
Issue Date2019
Citation
Journal of Child and Family Studies, 2019 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective Media multitasking has been found to have a negative relationship with young people’s psychological well-being. However, its relationship with self-esteem has only been examined among adults, and the mechanism underlying its association with adolescents’ well-being has been unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between media multitasking and self-esteem and explore the effects of peer influence and family functioning as potential mediators of this association. Methods A sample of 725 Chinese adolescents (55.6% girls; Mage = 14.71, SD = 1.41) completed a paper-based survey, which included questions on demographics, media multitasking, peer influence, family functioning, and self-esteem. Structural equation modeling and multi-group analyses were performed on the collected data. Results Media multitasking (MM) showed a negative association with self-esteem (SE) (r = −0.17, p < 0.001); however, peer influence (PI) and family functioning (FF) entirely mediated this relationship, i.e., MM→FF→SE (β = −0.059, p < 0.05) and MM→PI→FF→SE (β = −0.025, p < 0.01). In addition, significant differences were found in specific mediation pathways among gender and age groups. Conclusions Overall, these findings have important implications for understanding the relationship between media multitasking and self-esteem among adolescents, as well as the age and gender differences.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279518

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLUO, J-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, PS-
dc.contributor.authorLi, H-
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-01T07:18:54Z-
dc.date.available2019-11-01T07:18:54Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Child and Family Studies, 2019-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279518-
dc.description.abstractObjective Media multitasking has been found to have a negative relationship with young people’s psychological well-being. However, its relationship with self-esteem has only been examined among adults, and the mechanism underlying its association with adolescents’ well-being has been unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between media multitasking and self-esteem and explore the effects of peer influence and family functioning as potential mediators of this association. Methods A sample of 725 Chinese adolescents (55.6% girls; Mage = 14.71, SD = 1.41) completed a paper-based survey, which included questions on demographics, media multitasking, peer influence, family functioning, and self-esteem. Structural equation modeling and multi-group analyses were performed on the collected data. Results Media multitasking (MM) showed a negative association with self-esteem (SE) (r = −0.17, p < 0.001); however, peer influence (PI) and family functioning (FF) entirely mediated this relationship, i.e., MM→FF→SE (β = −0.059, p < 0.05) and MM→PI→FF→SE (β = −0.025, p < 0.01). In addition, significant differences were found in specific mediation pathways among gender and age groups. Conclusions Overall, these findings have important implications for understanding the relationship between media multitasking and self-esteem among adolescents, as well as the age and gender differences.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Child and Family Studies-
dc.titleRelationship Between Media Multitasking and Self-esteem Among Chinese Adolescents: Mediating Roles of Peer Influence and Family Functioning-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYeung, PS: patcyy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, PS=rp00641-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10826-019-01613-3-
dc.identifier.hkuros308461-

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