File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

Supplementary

Conference Paper: Prospective associations of partner smoking with mental and perceived family well-being in mothers of young children

TitleProspective associations of partner smoking with mental and perceived family well-being in mothers of young children
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherSchool of Nursing, The University of Hong Kong.
Citation
The 9th Hong Kong International Nursing Forum cum 1st Greater Bay Area Nursing Conference, Shenzhen, China, 9-10 December 2019 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and Objectives: Nearly one-third of mothers whose partners are smokers in Hong Kong. Yet, studies on the impacts of partner smoking on the well-being of mother and family are limited. This study examined the associations of partner smoking (mostly husband) with mental and perceived family well-being in mothers of young children in Hong Kong. Methods: A 3-year prospective cohort of 422 non-smoking mothers with young children (aged ≤18 months) were enrolled from four Maternal and Child Health Centres. Mother reported partner smoking, depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9]), happiness level (Subjective Happiness Scale score [SHS]; range 1–7), and perceived family harmony and family happiness (each measured on a Likert scale of 0 to 10). Linear and logistic regression were used to examine the prospective association of partner smoking with depression symptoms, happiness and family well-being, adjusting for age, education level and monthly household income. Results: 169 (40%) partners of mothers were smokers. 5.7% (95%CI: 3.9%, 8.3%) mothers had risk of depression (scoring >4 on PHQ-9); the mean±SD score of SHS, perceived family harmony and happiness were 5.3±1.0, 7.7±1.4 and 7.7±1.4, respectively. Multivariable analyses showed that mothers whose partners were smoking (vs non-smoking) were associated with an increased risk of depression (AOR=3.72, 95% CI: 1.46, 9.44), lower happiness level (adjusted b= -0.067, 95% CI: -0.13, 0.0034), and lower levels of family harmony (adjusted b= -0.28, 95% CI: -0.56, -0.0033) and family happiness (adjusted b= -0.36, 95% CI -0.64, -0.085). The results were similar after excluding fathers who initiated (n=19) or quit smoking (n=20) during the study period. Conclusions: Partner smoking predicted adverse mental and perceived family well-being in mothers of young children. The findings, if confirmed by further studies, could be a new warning for motivating male smokers to quit.
DescriptionOral Presentation - Concurrent Session 4: Smoking Cessation and Tobacco Control: no. CS4-3
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279936

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, HL-
dc.contributor.authorLuk, TT-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSC-
dc.contributor.authorWang, MP-
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-23T08:23:55Z-
dc.date.available2019-12-23T08:23:55Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationThe 9th Hong Kong International Nursing Forum cum 1st Greater Bay Area Nursing Conference, Shenzhen, China, 9-10 December 2019-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279936-
dc.descriptionOral Presentation - Concurrent Session 4: Smoking Cessation and Tobacco Control: no. CS4-3-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Objectives: Nearly one-third of mothers whose partners are smokers in Hong Kong. Yet, studies on the impacts of partner smoking on the well-being of mother and family are limited. This study examined the associations of partner smoking (mostly husband) with mental and perceived family well-being in mothers of young children in Hong Kong. Methods: A 3-year prospective cohort of 422 non-smoking mothers with young children (aged ≤18 months) were enrolled from four Maternal and Child Health Centres. Mother reported partner smoking, depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9]), happiness level (Subjective Happiness Scale score [SHS]; range 1–7), and perceived family harmony and family happiness (each measured on a Likert scale of 0 to 10). Linear and logistic regression were used to examine the prospective association of partner smoking with depression symptoms, happiness and family well-being, adjusting for age, education level and monthly household income. Results: 169 (40%) partners of mothers were smokers. 5.7% (95%CI: 3.9%, 8.3%) mothers had risk of depression (scoring >4 on PHQ-9); the mean±SD score of SHS, perceived family harmony and happiness were 5.3±1.0, 7.7±1.4 and 7.7±1.4, respectively. Multivariable analyses showed that mothers whose partners were smoking (vs non-smoking) were associated with an increased risk of depression (AOR=3.72, 95% CI: 1.46, 9.44), lower happiness level (adjusted b= -0.067, 95% CI: -0.13, 0.0034), and lower levels of family harmony (adjusted b= -0.28, 95% CI: -0.56, -0.0033) and family happiness (adjusted b= -0.36, 95% CI -0.64, -0.085). The results were similar after excluding fathers who initiated (n=19) or quit smoking (n=20) during the study period. Conclusions: Partner smoking predicted adverse mental and perceived family well-being in mothers of young children. The findings, if confirmed by further studies, could be a new warning for motivating male smokers to quit.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSchool of Nursing, The University of Hong Kong. -
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong International Nursing Forum cum 1st Greater Bay Area Nursing Conference-
dc.titleProspective associations of partner smoking with mental and perceived family well-being in mothers of young children-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailLuk, TT: lukkevin@HKUCC-COM.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SSC: scsophia@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWang, MP: mpwang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SSC=rp00423-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, MP=rp01863-
dc.identifier.hkuros308815-
dc.publisher.placeChina-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats