File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Sleep quality and cognitive impairment in older Chinese: Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

TitleSleep quality and cognitive impairment in older Chinese: Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
Authors
Keywordssleep
Pittsburgh sleep quality index
cognition
memory impairment
depression
Issue Date2020
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Age and Ageing, 2020, v. 49 n. 1, p. 119-124 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: evidence concerning the relationship between sleep quality and cognitive impairment is limited and inconsistent. Objective: to examine the association of sleep quality with memory impairment and poor cognitive function in a large sample of older Chinese. Methods: 15,246 participants aged 50+ years of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study who attended the second physical examination from 2008 to 2012 were included. Sleep quality was assessed using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and cognitive performance was assessed using both Delayed Word Recall Test (DWRT) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Memory impairment was defined by DWRT score < 4 and poor cognitive function by MMSE score < 25. Results: after adjusting for potential confounders, lower habitual sleep efficiency was associated with a higher risk of memory impairment and poor cognitive function with a dose-response pattern (both P for trend <0.001). The adjusted odds ratio (OR, 95% confidence interval (CI)) for poor cognitive function in those with the sleep efficiency of 75–85%, 65–75% and <65%, versus ≥85%, was 1.31 (1.12–1.53), 1.41 (1.16–1.73) and 1.33 (1.09–1.63), respectively. No association of the global PSQI score with memory impairment or poor cognitive function was found. Conclusions: in older Chinese people, lower habitual sleep efficiency was associated with a higher risk of memory impairment and poorer cognitive function.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280086
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 4.902
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.611

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMa, XQ-
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQ-
dc.contributor.authorXu, L-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WS-
dc.contributor.authorZhu, F-
dc.contributor.authorJin, YL-
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GN-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-06T02:00:45Z-
dc.date.available2020-01-06T02:00:45Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationAge and Ageing, 2020, v. 49 n. 1, p. 119-124-
dc.identifier.issn0002-0729-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280086-
dc.description.abstractBackground: evidence concerning the relationship between sleep quality and cognitive impairment is limited and inconsistent. Objective: to examine the association of sleep quality with memory impairment and poor cognitive function in a large sample of older Chinese. Methods: 15,246 participants aged 50+ years of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study who attended the second physical examination from 2008 to 2012 were included. Sleep quality was assessed using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and cognitive performance was assessed using both Delayed Word Recall Test (DWRT) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Memory impairment was defined by DWRT score < 4 and poor cognitive function by MMSE score < 25. Results: after adjusting for potential confounders, lower habitual sleep efficiency was associated with a higher risk of memory impairment and poor cognitive function with a dose-response pattern (both P for trend <0.001). The adjusted odds ratio (OR, 95% confidence interval (CI)) for poor cognitive function in those with the sleep efficiency of 75–85%, 65–75% and <65%, versus ≥85%, was 1.31 (1.12–1.53), 1.41 (1.16–1.73) and 1.33 (1.09–1.63), respectively. No association of the global PSQI score with memory impairment or poor cognitive function was found. Conclusions: in older Chinese people, lower habitual sleep efficiency was associated with a higher risk of memory impairment and poorer cognitive function.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofAge and Ageing-
dc.rightsPre-print: Journal Title] ©: [year] [owner as specified on the article] Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of xxxxxx]. All rights reserved. Pre-print (Once an article is published, preprint notice should be amended to): This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Article as published in the print edition of the Journal.] Post-print: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL that the author will receive upon publication here].-
dc.subjectsleep-
dc.subjectPittsburgh sleep quality index-
dc.subjectcognition-
dc.subjectmemory impairment-
dc.subjectdepression-
dc.titleSleep quality and cognitive impairment in older Chinese: Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailJiang, CQ: cqjiang@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailXu, L: linxu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, WS: zhangws9@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailThomas, GN: neilt@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityXu, L=rp02030-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ageing/afz120-
dc.identifier.pmid31665199-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85076585286-
dc.identifier.hkuros308883-
dc.identifier.volume49-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage119-
dc.identifier.epage124-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats