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Article: Preventing respiratory tract infections by synbiotic interventions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

TitlePreventing respiratory tract infections by synbiotic interventions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
Authors
Keywordssynbiotics
probiotics
prebiotics
respiratory tract infections
meta-analysis
Issue Date2020
PublisherOxford University Press, published in association with American Society for Nutrition. The Journal's web site is located at http://advances.nutrition.org
Citation
Advances in Nutrition, 2020, Epub 2020-01-29 How to Cite?
AbstractDysbiosis of the human gut microbiome has been linked to various health conditions, including respiratory tract infections (RTIs) through the gut–lung axis. Several trials have reported that synbiotic therapy could help prevent RTIs or relieve symptoms of some diseases. This meta-analysis comprehensively evaluates the clinical effects of synbiotic supplements for preventing RTIs. PubMed and Google Scholar were searched by keywords for eligible clinical trials until April 2019. Sixty-two studies were retrieved, and 16 studies were selected for meta-analysis. The primary outcomes were defined as the proportion of participants with RTIs at least once or the times of RTI episodes during follow-up based on the intention-to-treat approach. Overall, synbiotic interventions reduced the incidence rate of RTIs by 16% (95% CI: 4%, 27%) and the proportion of participants experiencing RTIs by 16% (95% CI: 5%, 26%). There was no significant evidence of publication bias. A subgroup analysis suggested more prominent effects of synbiotics among adults than infants and children for RTI prevention. The sensitivity analysis excluding trials with prebiotics or probiotics as controls was consistent with our primary analysis. This meta-analysis of clinical trials involving >10,000 individuals showed that synbiotic interventions could be an alternative nutrition strategy for conferring human health and preventing RTIs. Future investigations on the clinical efficacy and safety of synbiotic interventions are warranted with strain-specific and dose-specific approaches.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280902
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 7.265

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, CKY-
dc.contributor.authorTAO, J-
dc.contributor.authorChan, OS-
dc.contributor.authorLi, H-B-
dc.contributor.authorPang, H-
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-25T07:42:12Z-
dc.date.available2020-02-25T07:42:12Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationAdvances in Nutrition, 2020, Epub 2020-01-29-
dc.identifier.issn2161-8313-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280902-
dc.description.abstractDysbiosis of the human gut microbiome has been linked to various health conditions, including respiratory tract infections (RTIs) through the gut–lung axis. Several trials have reported that synbiotic therapy could help prevent RTIs or relieve symptoms of some diseases. This meta-analysis comprehensively evaluates the clinical effects of synbiotic supplements for preventing RTIs. PubMed and Google Scholar were searched by keywords for eligible clinical trials until April 2019. Sixty-two studies were retrieved, and 16 studies were selected for meta-analysis. The primary outcomes were defined as the proportion of participants with RTIs at least once or the times of RTI episodes during follow-up based on the intention-to-treat approach. Overall, synbiotic interventions reduced the incidence rate of RTIs by 16% (95% CI: 4%, 27%) and the proportion of participants experiencing RTIs by 16% (95% CI: 5%, 26%). There was no significant evidence of publication bias. A subgroup analysis suggested more prominent effects of synbiotics among adults than infants and children for RTI prevention. The sensitivity analysis excluding trials with prebiotics or probiotics as controls was consistent with our primary analysis. This meta-analysis of clinical trials involving >10,000 individuals showed that synbiotic interventions could be an alternative nutrition strategy for conferring human health and preventing RTIs. Future investigations on the clinical efficacy and safety of synbiotic interventions are warranted with strain-specific and dose-specific approaches.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press, published in association with American Society for Nutrition. The Journal's web site is located at http://advances.nutrition.org-
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Nutrition-
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The version of record [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL and DOI of the article on the OUP website].-
dc.subjectsynbiotics-
dc.subjectprobiotics-
dc.subjectprebiotics-
dc.subjectrespiratory tract infections-
dc.subjectmeta-analysis-
dc.titlePreventing respiratory tract infections by synbiotic interventions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, OS: chanoska@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPang, H: herbpang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityPang, H=rp01857-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/advances/nmaa003-
dc.identifier.hkuros309155-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-01-29-
dc.identifier.spagepii: nmaa003-
dc.identifier.epagepii: nmaa003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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