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Article: From farm-scale to lab-scale: The characterization of engineered irrigation water distribution system biofilm models using an artificial freshwater source

TitleFrom farm-scale to lab-scale: The characterization of engineered irrigation water distribution system biofilm models using an artificial freshwater source
Authors
KeywordsIrrigation water distribution system
Laboratory-based simulated freshwater source
Annular biofilm reactor
Confocal laser scanning microscopy
16S metagenomics
Issue Date2020
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv
Citation
Science of the Total Environment, 2020, v. 698, p. article no. 134025 How to Cite?
AbstractContaminants in freshwater environments, as well as the associated negative impacts on agricultural produce, have emerged as a critical theme of the water–energy–food nexus affecting food safety and irrigation management. Agricultural produce exposed to irrigation with questionable freshwater can internalize and concentrate pollutants. However, the potential risks posed by the ubiquitous presence of biofilms within irrigation water distribution systems (IWDS) remains overlooked, even though such biofilms may harbor and spread pathogenic, chemical, and other environmental pollutants. Our limited knowledge about the role and functional attributes of IWDS biofilms can be blamed mostly to experimental challenges encountered during attempted studies of these biofilms in their natural environments. Hence, a laboratory-based experimental system designed to simulate a freshwater environment was combined with a biofilm reactor capable of recreating the piping environments in water distribution systems. This experimental system was then tested to assess the robustness and repeatability of experimental early-stage biofilms with respect to physical structure and microbial community, using state-of-the-art confocal microscopy and next-generation sequencing, respectively. The results demonstrated the suitability of this laboratory-based experimental system for studying the impacts of selected pollutants on irrigation water distribution systems.
DescriptionLink to Free access
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281256
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.61
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.702

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNGAN, WY-
dc.contributor.authorHabimana, O-
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-09T09:52:10Z-
dc.date.available2020-03-09T09:52:10Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationScience of the Total Environment, 2020, v. 698, p. article no. 134025-
dc.identifier.issn0048-9697-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281256-
dc.descriptionLink to Free access-
dc.description.abstractContaminants in freshwater environments, as well as the associated negative impacts on agricultural produce, have emerged as a critical theme of the water–energy–food nexus affecting food safety and irrigation management. Agricultural produce exposed to irrigation with questionable freshwater can internalize and concentrate pollutants. However, the potential risks posed by the ubiquitous presence of biofilms within irrigation water distribution systems (IWDS) remains overlooked, even though such biofilms may harbor and spread pathogenic, chemical, and other environmental pollutants. Our limited knowledge about the role and functional attributes of IWDS biofilms can be blamed mostly to experimental challenges encountered during attempted studies of these biofilms in their natural environments. Hence, a laboratory-based experimental system designed to simulate a freshwater environment was combined with a biofilm reactor capable of recreating the piping environments in water distribution systems. This experimental system was then tested to assess the robustness and repeatability of experimental early-stage biofilms with respect to physical structure and microbial community, using state-of-the-art confocal microscopy and next-generation sequencing, respectively. The results demonstrated the suitability of this laboratory-based experimental system for studying the impacts of selected pollutants on irrigation water distribution systems.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv-
dc.relation.ispartofScience of the Total Environment-
dc.subjectIrrigation water distribution system-
dc.subjectLaboratory-based simulated freshwater source-
dc.subjectAnnular biofilm reactor-
dc.subjectConfocal laser scanning microscopy-
dc.subject16S metagenomics-
dc.titleFrom farm-scale to lab-scale: The characterization of engineered irrigation water distribution system biofilm models using an artificial freshwater source-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHabimana, O: ohabim@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHabimana, O=rp02169-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.134025-
dc.identifier.pmid31493571-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85071625188-
dc.identifier.hkuros309379-
dc.identifier.volume698-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 134025-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 134025-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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