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Article: Association between prenatal depressive symptoms and eczema in infants: The Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study

TitleAssociation between prenatal depressive symptoms and eczema in infants: The Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study
Authors
Keywordscohort
eczema
infant
prenatal depressive symptoms
Issue Date2020
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1399-3038
Citation
Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 2020, Epub 2020-04-16 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Eczema is a growing threat on infants’ health, and the role of maternal depression in the risk of eczema's early onset is unclear. This study aimed to examine the associations of different exposure timing of prenatal depressive symptoms with offspring's eczema in infancy. Methods: The study was part of the ongoing prospective Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study. Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed at both early (<20th week of gestation) and late pregnancy (≥33rd week of gestation to delivery) using the Self‐Rating Depression Scale. Information on the diagnosis of eczema was collected when the children were 1 year old. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between prenatal depressive symptoms and infants’ eczema and test for moderation by parental history of allergic diseases. Results: In this population, 7.7% (447/5825) of mothers experienced persistent depressive symptoms during pregnancy, 10.1% (590/5825) had depressive symptoms only at early pregnancy, and 8.4% (489/5825) of women experienced depressive symptoms only at late pregnancy. After adjusting for potential confounders, higher risks of eczema were observed in infants of mothers with persistent prenatal depressive symptoms when compared to those children without maternal depressive symptoms throughout pregnancy (OR: 1.55, 95% CI 1.19‐2.03). These associations were marginally more pronounced among children in families without parents affected by allergic diseases than in other families (P for interaction = .064 for courses of prenatal depressive symptoms). Conclusion: Persistent maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy increased the risk of infants’ eczema, especially in children without family history of allergic diseases. These associations, if proved to be causal, could be an intervention target not only to improve women's health but also to prevent offspring's eczema.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282469
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.137
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.689

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWei, D-
dc.contributor.authorAu Yeung, SL-
dc.contributor.authorLu, M-
dc.contributor.authorXiao, W-
dc.contributor.authorLu, J-
dc.contributor.authorShen, S-
dc.contributor.authorLam, KBH-
dc.contributor.authorQiu, X-
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-15T05:28:31Z-
dc.date.available2020-05-15T05:28:31Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Allergy and Immunology, 2020, Epub 2020-04-16-
dc.identifier.issn0905-6157-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282469-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Eczema is a growing threat on infants’ health, and the role of maternal depression in the risk of eczema's early onset is unclear. This study aimed to examine the associations of different exposure timing of prenatal depressive symptoms with offspring's eczema in infancy. Methods: The study was part of the ongoing prospective Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study. Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed at both early (<20th week of gestation) and late pregnancy (≥33rd week of gestation to delivery) using the Self‐Rating Depression Scale. Information on the diagnosis of eczema was collected when the children were 1 year old. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between prenatal depressive symptoms and infants’ eczema and test for moderation by parental history of allergic diseases. Results: In this population, 7.7% (447/5825) of mothers experienced persistent depressive symptoms during pregnancy, 10.1% (590/5825) had depressive symptoms only at early pregnancy, and 8.4% (489/5825) of women experienced depressive symptoms only at late pregnancy. After adjusting for potential confounders, higher risks of eczema were observed in infants of mothers with persistent prenatal depressive symptoms when compared to those children without maternal depressive symptoms throughout pregnancy (OR: 1.55, 95% CI 1.19‐2.03). These associations were marginally more pronounced among children in families without parents affected by allergic diseases than in other families (P for interaction = .064 for courses of prenatal depressive symptoms). Conclusion: Persistent maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy increased the risk of infants’ eczema, especially in children without family history of allergic diseases. These associations, if proved to be causal, could be an intervention target not only to improve women's health but also to prevent offspring's eczema.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1399-3038-
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Allergy and Immunology-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectcohort-
dc.subjecteczema-
dc.subjectinfant-
dc.subjectprenatal depressive symptoms-
dc.titleAssociation between prenatal depressive symptoms and eczema in infants: The Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailAu Yeung, SL: ayslryan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityAu Yeung, SL=rp02224-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/pai.13254-
dc.identifier.pmid32301157-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85083981710-
dc.identifier.hkuros309898-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-04-16-
dc.publisher.placeDenmark-

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