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Article: Characterizing Hydrogen Microbubble Stiffness Properties Using Atomic Force Microscopy

TitleCharacterizing Hydrogen Microbubble Stiffness Properties Using Atomic Force Microscopy
Authors
KeywordsTemperature measurement
Force
Hydrogen
Probes
Temperature
Issue Date2020
PublisherIEEE. The Journal's web site is located at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?punumber=7729
Citation
IEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology, 2020, v. 19, p. 209-213 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the past decades, bubbles have been gaining extensive attentions for their wide range of applications, especially those at the micro-scale. Research on the bubbles' mechanical properties is necessary for better implementations. Precise measurement of the microbubbles' mechanical properties (e.g. stiffness and adhesion) relies largely on delicate manipulation technologies in aqueous environment. As a consequence, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely adopted in this field. Bubble stiffness is an important indicator to reflect the stability. Existing studies mainly focused on statistic property of the microbubbles' stiffness, which may omit delicate specific characteristics of a single microbubble. In this letter, as an instance, AFM-based stiffness measurement of a single hydrogen microbubble has been carried out. The electrochemistry method was adopted to generate stable hydrogen microbubbles. By using force volume mode of a commercial AFM, the temperature-dependent stiffness property of the microbubble was studied. Furthermore, stiffness map of a single microbubble was captured, which shows location-dependent anisotropic characteristic, contradicting the preassumption that stiffness of bubbles should be isotropic. To explain this phenomenon, the contact condition between the AFM tip and the bubble surface is considered as the key reason that induces the anisotropic observation, and a corresponding model is established to verify this hypothesis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282917
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.196
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.708

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYU, H-
dc.contributor.authorXUE, Y-
dc.contributor.authorSun, Z-
dc.contributor.authorXi, N-
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-05T06:23:03Z-
dc.date.available2020-06-05T06:23:03Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationIEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology, 2020, v. 19, p. 209-213-
dc.identifier.issn1536-125X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282917-
dc.description.abstractIn the past decades, bubbles have been gaining extensive attentions for their wide range of applications, especially those at the micro-scale. Research on the bubbles' mechanical properties is necessary for better implementations. Precise measurement of the microbubbles' mechanical properties (e.g. stiffness and adhesion) relies largely on delicate manipulation technologies in aqueous environment. As a consequence, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely adopted in this field. Bubble stiffness is an important indicator to reflect the stability. Existing studies mainly focused on statistic property of the microbubbles' stiffness, which may omit delicate specific characteristics of a single microbubble. In this letter, as an instance, AFM-based stiffness measurement of a single hydrogen microbubble has been carried out. The electrochemistry method was adopted to generate stable hydrogen microbubbles. By using force volume mode of a commercial AFM, the temperature-dependent stiffness property of the microbubble was studied. Furthermore, stiffness map of a single microbubble was captured, which shows location-dependent anisotropic characteristic, contradicting the preassumption that stiffness of bubbles should be isotropic. To explain this phenomenon, the contact condition between the AFM tip and the bubble surface is considered as the key reason that induces the anisotropic observation, and a corresponding model is established to verify this hypothesis.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherIEEE. The Journal's web site is located at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?punumber=7729-
dc.relation.ispartofIEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology-
dc.rightsIEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology. Copyright © IEEE.-
dc.rights©20xx IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.-
dc.subjectTemperature measurement-
dc.subjectForce-
dc.subjectHydrogen-
dc.subjectProbes-
dc.subjectTemperature-
dc.titleCharacterizing Hydrogen Microbubble Stiffness Properties Using Atomic Force Microscopy-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXi, N: xining@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityXi, N=rp02044-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/TNANO.2020.2975060-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85082467730-
dc.identifier.hkuros310026-
dc.identifier.volume19-
dc.identifier.spage209-
dc.identifier.epage213-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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