File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Detecting the intellectual pathway of resilience thinking in urban and regional studies: A critical reflection on resilience literature

TitleDetecting the intellectual pathway of resilience thinking in urban and regional studies: A critical reflection on resilience literature
Authors
KeywordsEconomic Resilience
Regional Innovation
External Shock
Issue Date2020
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1468-2257
Citation
Growth and Change, 2020, Epub 2020-06-25 How to Cite?
AbstractConfronted with increasing natural and anthropogenic crises, sustainable urban and regional development requires a sound understanding of how cities and regions respond to those crises and how that response shapes their continued development. The conceptual ambiguity and missing link among varied perspectives of resilience studies have given rise to a sneaking suspicion about the contribution of resilience thinking. By conducting a network analysis of 1,274 papers published between 1991 and 2019 using CiteSpace, we detect and visualize the intellectual pathway of resilience thinking and argue for its malleability to deepen our understanding about human‐environment dynamics. Three major research clusters were identified: adaptive capacity of ecosystems, regional variation in economic resilience, and social resilience of disadvantaged communities. Resistance and recovery of systems are the key concerns in the first two clusters, whereas social resilience emphasizes opportunities and processes of restructuring rather than returning to the pre‐crisis status. The extension of resilience thinking to the social realm is a promising area for future research. It calls for a shift of epistemology from the deterministic structure‐function hypothesis which is place‐less toward a situated understanding of context, relation, and human adaptation despite the methodological challenges ahead.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/283776
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 2.202
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.657
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMai, X-
dc.contributor.authorChan, RCK-
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-03T08:23:56Z-
dc.date.available2020-07-03T08:23:56Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationGrowth and Change, 2020, Epub 2020-06-25-
dc.identifier.issn0017-4815-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/283776-
dc.description.abstractConfronted with increasing natural and anthropogenic crises, sustainable urban and regional development requires a sound understanding of how cities and regions respond to those crises and how that response shapes their continued development. The conceptual ambiguity and missing link among varied perspectives of resilience studies have given rise to a sneaking suspicion about the contribution of resilience thinking. By conducting a network analysis of 1,274 papers published between 1991 and 2019 using CiteSpace, we detect and visualize the intellectual pathway of resilience thinking and argue for its malleability to deepen our understanding about human‐environment dynamics. Three major research clusters were identified: adaptive capacity of ecosystems, regional variation in economic resilience, and social resilience of disadvantaged communities. Resistance and recovery of systems are the key concerns in the first two clusters, whereas social resilience emphasizes opportunities and processes of restructuring rather than returning to the pre‐crisis status. The extension of resilience thinking to the social realm is a promising area for future research. It calls for a shift of epistemology from the deterministic structure‐function hypothesis which is place‐less toward a situated understanding of context, relation, and human adaptation despite the methodological challenges ahead.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1468-2257-
dc.relation.ispartofGrowth and Change-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectEconomic Resilience-
dc.subjectRegional Innovation-
dc.subjectExternal Shock-
dc.titleDetecting the intellectual pathway of resilience thinking in urban and regional studies: A critical reflection on resilience literature-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, RCK: hrxucck@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, RCK=rp00992-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/grow.12390-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85087166786-
dc.identifier.hkuros310736-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-06-25-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000542797800001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl0017-4815-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats