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Article: Prevalence and correlates of hyperuricemia in the middle-aged and older adults in China

TitlePrevalence and correlates of hyperuricemia in the middle-aged and older adults in China
Authors
Keywordsaged
China
female
health behavior
human
Issue Date2018
PublisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature): Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html
Citation
Scientific Reports, 2018, v. 8 n. 1, p. article no. 4314 How to Cite?
AbstractHyperuricemia, the physiological prerequisite for gout, is linked to the presence and severity of multiple comorbidities that affect longevity and well-being. By using the baseline data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, a nationally representative survey, the prevalence of hyperuricemia in general middle-aged and older Chinese was estimated. The potential effects of health behaviours and comorbidities on hyperuricemia were also explored. In 2010, the prevalence of hyperuricemia among middle-aged and older Chinese was 6.4%. Hyperuricemia was more prevalent in males than in females (7.9% vs. 4.9%). The risk of hyperuricemia increased with advanced age in both sexes. In males, current drinking, obesity and dyslipidemia were positively associated with hyperuricemia, whereas singles males and males living in North China were with lower odds of having hyperuricemia. For females, being single, at a higher economic level, living in the Southwest China, smoking, obesity, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia were all significant risk factors for hyperuricemia, but females living in North China and Northwest China were with a lower hyperuricemia prevalence than females in East China. Therefore, hyperuricemia in China was not as prevalent as in developed countries, its prevalence varied greatly according to demographic, socioeconomic, and geographic factors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284884
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.998
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.073
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSong, P-
dc.contributor.authorWang, H-
dc.contributor.authorXIA, W-
dc.contributor.authorChang, X-
dc.contributor.authorWang, M-
dc.contributor.authorAn, L-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T09:03:53Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-07T09:03:53Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Reports, 2018, v. 8 n. 1, p. article no. 4314-
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284884-
dc.description.abstractHyperuricemia, the physiological prerequisite for gout, is linked to the presence and severity of multiple comorbidities that affect longevity and well-being. By using the baseline data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, a nationally representative survey, the prevalence of hyperuricemia in general middle-aged and older Chinese was estimated. The potential effects of health behaviours and comorbidities on hyperuricemia were also explored. In 2010, the prevalence of hyperuricemia among middle-aged and older Chinese was 6.4%. Hyperuricemia was more prevalent in males than in females (7.9% vs. 4.9%). The risk of hyperuricemia increased with advanced age in both sexes. In males, current drinking, obesity and dyslipidemia were positively associated with hyperuricemia, whereas singles males and males living in North China were with lower odds of having hyperuricemia. For females, being single, at a higher economic level, living in the Southwest China, smoking, obesity, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia were all significant risk factors for hyperuricemia, but females living in North China and Northwest China were with a lower hyperuricemia prevalence than females in East China. Therefore, hyperuricemia in China was not as prevalent as in developed countries, its prevalence varied greatly according to demographic, socioeconomic, and geographic factors.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature): Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectaged-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectfemale-
dc.subjecthealth behavior-
dc.subjecthuman-
dc.titlePrevalence and correlates of hyperuricemia in the middle-aged and older adults in China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-018-22570-9-
dc.identifier.pmid29531237-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC5847518-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85044167570-
dc.identifier.hkuros312265-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 4314-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 4314-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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