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Article: Beliefs in Conspiracy Theories Following Ostracism

TitleBeliefs in Conspiracy Theories Following Ostracism
Authors
Keywordsostracism
social exclusion
conspiracy beliefs
vulnerability
self-affirmation
Issue Date2020
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=65
Citation
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 2020, v. 46 n. 8, p. 1234-1246 How to Cite?
AbstractFour studies (total valid N = 643) examined whether ostracism increases people’s political conspiracy beliefs through heightened vulnerability and whether self-affirmation intervention counteracts the effect of ostracism on conspiracy beliefs. Compared with their nonostracized counterparts, ostracized participants were more likely to endorse conspiracy beliefs related to different political issues (Studies 1–3). Moreover, heightened vulnerability mediated the link between ostracism and conspiracy beliefs (Studies 1–3). Offering ostracized participants an opportunity to reaffirm values important to them could reduce their political conspiracy beliefs (Study 4). Taken together, our findings highlight the crucial role of vulnerability in understanding when and why ostracism increases conspiracy beliefs and how to ameliorate this relationship. Our findings also provide novel insights into how daily interpersonal interactions influence people’s political beliefs and involvement.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/286110
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.97
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.726

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPoon, TK-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Z-
dc.contributor.authorWong, WY-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-31T06:59:16Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-31T06:59:16Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 2020, v. 46 n. 8, p. 1234-1246-
dc.identifier.issn0146-1672-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/286110-
dc.description.abstractFour studies (total valid N = 643) examined whether ostracism increases people’s political conspiracy beliefs through heightened vulnerability and whether self-affirmation intervention counteracts the effect of ostracism on conspiracy beliefs. Compared with their nonostracized counterparts, ostracized participants were more likely to endorse conspiracy beliefs related to different political issues (Studies 1–3). Moreover, heightened vulnerability mediated the link between ostracism and conspiracy beliefs (Studies 1–3). Offering ostracized participants an opportunity to reaffirm values important to them could reduce their political conspiracy beliefs (Study 4). Taken together, our findings highlight the crucial role of vulnerability in understanding when and why ostracism increases conspiracy beliefs and how to ameliorate this relationship. Our findings also provide novel insights into how daily interpersonal interactions influence people’s political beliefs and involvement.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=65-
dc.relation.ispartofPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin-
dc.rightsPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectostracism-
dc.subjectsocial exclusion-
dc.subjectconspiracy beliefs-
dc.subjectvulnerability-
dc.subjectself-affirmation-
dc.titleBeliefs in Conspiracy Theories Following Ostracism-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChen, Z: chenz@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, Z=rp00629-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0146167219898944-
dc.identifier.pmid31928312-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85078302455-
dc.identifier.hkuros313677-
dc.identifier.volume46-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage1234-
dc.identifier.epage1246-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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