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Article: The Post-urban Gaze and Hong Kong Independent Cinema: An Ecofeminist Perspective

TitleThe Post-urban Gaze and Hong Kong Independent Cinema: An Ecofeminist Perspective
Authors
KeywordsHong Kong
Documentary
Ecofeminism
Nature
Oral histories
Post-2008
Water
Issue Date2019
PublisherIntellect Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=219/
Citation
Asian Cinema, 2019, v. 30 n. 2, p. 219-234 How to Cite?
AbstractThe city has always been a prominent subject in Hong Kong cinema. Land has been seen only as a profitable commodity, controlled by property developers and the wealthy. Instead of exploring the countryside and the traditional farming and fishing villages, people shifted their focus to Hong Kong: its skyline became the only valid point of perception. This marginalization of nature, however, was challenged in 2008 during the dispute between the villagers of Choi Yuen village and the Hong Kong government regarding the construction of Guangzhou‐Hong Kong High-Speed Rail Link, which would demolish the village of 500 people that lay along its path. This article looks at Jessey Tsang’s documentary Flowing Stories (2014) and adopts an ecofeminist perspective on the ways in which Hong Kong’s cultural imaginary has been reinvented in films. The role of documentaries in the independent film scene will be reviewed, especially the social-issue documentaries that have become popular since 2008. An ecofeminist approach to our understanding of Hong Kong could shift the paradigm of our stagnant cultural imaginary ‐ the urban city ‐ and resituate Hong Kong in a closer connection with its surroundings and the world.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/286763
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYee, WLM-
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-04T13:29:57Z-
dc.date.available2020-09-04T13:29:57Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationAsian Cinema, 2019, v. 30 n. 2, p. 219-234-
dc.identifier.issn1059-440X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/286763-
dc.description.abstractThe city has always been a prominent subject in Hong Kong cinema. Land has been seen only as a profitable commodity, controlled by property developers and the wealthy. Instead of exploring the countryside and the traditional farming and fishing villages, people shifted their focus to Hong Kong: its skyline became the only valid point of perception. This marginalization of nature, however, was challenged in 2008 during the dispute between the villagers of Choi Yuen village and the Hong Kong government regarding the construction of Guangzhou‐Hong Kong High-Speed Rail Link, which would demolish the village of 500 people that lay along its path. This article looks at Jessey Tsang’s documentary Flowing Stories (2014) and adopts an ecofeminist perspective on the ways in which Hong Kong’s cultural imaginary has been reinvented in films. The role of documentaries in the independent film scene will be reviewed, especially the social-issue documentaries that have become popular since 2008. An ecofeminist approach to our understanding of Hong Kong could shift the paradigm of our stagnant cultural imaginary ‐ the urban city ‐ and resituate Hong Kong in a closer connection with its surroundings and the world.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherIntellect Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=219/-
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Cinema-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectDocumentary-
dc.subjectEcofeminism-
dc.subjectNature-
dc.subjectOral histories-
dc.subjectPost-2008-
dc.subjectWater-
dc.titleThe Post-urban Gaze and Hong Kong Independent Cinema: An Ecofeminist Perspective-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYee, WLM: yeelmw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYee, WLM=rp01401-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1386/ac_00005_1-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85075287437-
dc.identifier.hkuros314066-
dc.identifier.volume30-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage219-
dc.identifier.epage234-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000497956100005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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