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Article: Putting the blame on others in suicide notes from Shanghai and Wuhan, China

TitlePutting the blame on others in suicide notes from Shanghai and Wuhan, China
Authors
KeywordsChina
Shanghai
Wuhan
Blame
Suicide note
Issue Date2020
PublisherHogrefe Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hogrefe.com/periodicals/crisis-the-journal-of-crisis-intervention-and-suicide-prevention/
Citation
Crisis: the journal of crisis intervention and suicide prevention, 2020 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Suicide note leavers sometimes blame others for their death. The blame could reveal extrinsic suicide risk factors and thus countermeasures may be ascertained. Aims: This study included suicide note leavers in Shanghai and Wuhan (n = 555) to examine (a) who was inclined to put the blame (b) on whom and (c) for what reason(s). Method: Logistic regressions were used to compare the note leavers who blamed others with those who did not. Cramer's V tests were used to examine the correlations between the note leavers' demographics and the targets of the blame. Results: Note leavers who used poisoning and cutting were more likely to blame others compared with those who used jumping, drowning, and hanging. Non-native note leavers tended to more frequently blame social problems and their workplaces compared with the natives. The common reasons for the blame on nonfamily members, children, and lovers/spouses were being mistakenly blamed for something, being disobedient, and having conflicts/hatred, respectively. Limitations: Some blame could have been made under the influence of psychiatric disorder/substances, and thus potentially deviated from the facts. Conclusion: Emotional/marriage consultations and family-therapy services should be made available to females experiencing love/family crises. Mental health services in the workplace could help reduce suicide risks.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287299
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.356
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.638

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, F-
dc.contributor.authorJia, H-
dc.contributor.authorCai, Z-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, S-
dc.contributor.authorLu, X-
dc.contributor.authorZeng, X-
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSF-
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-22T02:58:53Z-
dc.date.available2020-09-22T02:58:53Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationCrisis: the journal of crisis intervention and suicide prevention, 2020-
dc.identifier.issn0227-5910-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287299-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Suicide note leavers sometimes blame others for their death. The blame could reveal extrinsic suicide risk factors and thus countermeasures may be ascertained. Aims: This study included suicide note leavers in Shanghai and Wuhan (n = 555) to examine (a) who was inclined to put the blame (b) on whom and (c) for what reason(s). Method: Logistic regressions were used to compare the note leavers who blamed others with those who did not. Cramer's V tests were used to examine the correlations between the note leavers' demographics and the targets of the blame. Results: Note leavers who used poisoning and cutting were more likely to blame others compared with those who used jumping, drowning, and hanging. Non-native note leavers tended to more frequently blame social problems and their workplaces compared with the natives. The common reasons for the blame on nonfamily members, children, and lovers/spouses were being mistakenly blamed for something, being disobedient, and having conflicts/hatred, respectively. Limitations: Some blame could have been made under the influence of psychiatric disorder/substances, and thus potentially deviated from the facts. Conclusion: Emotional/marriage consultations and family-therapy services should be made available to females experiencing love/family crises. Mental health services in the workplace could help reduce suicide risks.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHogrefe Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hogrefe.com/periodicals/crisis-the-journal-of-crisis-intervention-and-suicide-prevention/-
dc.relation.ispartofCrisis: the journal of crisis intervention and suicide prevention-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectShanghai-
dc.subjectWuhan-
dc.subjectBlame-
dc.subjectSuicide note-
dc.titlePutting the blame on others in suicide notes from Shanghai and Wuhan, China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1027/0227-5910/a000677-
dc.identifier.pmid32343168-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85084419323-
dc.identifier.hkuros314347-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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