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Article: Creole typology is analytic typology

TitleCreole typology is analytic typology
Authors
Keywordsanalytic language
Creole
Kwa
linguistic complexity
phylogenetic network and Sinitic
Issue Date2019
PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Co. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.benjamins.com/catalog/le
Citation
Language Ecology, 2019, v. 3 n. 1, p. 89-119 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper reviews a number of specific features typical of analytic languages, in an attempt to investigate whether Creole languages can indeed be grouped, at least structurally, with other languages of the analytic (or isolating) type. Based on Sybesma et al. (forthcoming), a study of the nature of analyticity, we select eight features which constitute rather obvious structural parallels between two unrelated groups, namely Sinitic and Kwa. In terms of Creole languages, these eight features can be also clearly located within the APiCS (Michaelis et al. 2013). Contrary to works like Bakker et al. (2011) which argue for the existence of a “Creole Prototype”, our results show that Creole languages do not cluster with each other against other non-Creole languages. Instead, various Creoles clearly owe their grammatical profile to the languages that dominate the typological environment in which they are formed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287839
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSzeto, PY-
dc.contributor.authorLai, JYK-
dc.contributor.authorAnsaldo, U-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-05T12:04:01Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-05T12:04:01Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationLanguage Ecology, 2019, v. 3 n. 1, p. 89-119-
dc.identifier.issn2452-1949-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287839-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reviews a number of specific features typical of analytic languages, in an attempt to investigate whether Creole languages can indeed be grouped, at least structurally, with other languages of the analytic (or isolating) type. Based on Sybesma et al. (forthcoming), a study of the nature of analyticity, we select eight features which constitute rather obvious structural parallels between two unrelated groups, namely Sinitic and Kwa. In terms of Creole languages, these eight features can be also clearly located within the APiCS (Michaelis et al. 2013). Contrary to works like Bakker et al. (2011) which argue for the existence of a “Creole Prototype”, our results show that Creole languages do not cluster with each other against other non-Creole languages. Instead, various Creoles clearly owe their grammatical profile to the languages that dominate the typological environment in which they are formed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Co. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.benjamins.com/catalog/le-
dc.relation.ispartofLanguage Ecology-
dc.rightsLanguage Ecology. Copyright © John Benjamins Publishing Co.-
dc.rightsReaders of post-print must contact John Benjamins Publishing for further reprinting or re-use-
dc.subjectanalytic language-
dc.subjectCreole-
dc.subjectKwa-
dc.subjectlinguistic complexity-
dc.subjectphylogenetic network and Sinitic-
dc.titleCreole typology is analytic typology-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSzeto, PY: pyszeto@HKUCC-COM.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailAnsaldo, U: ansaldo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityAnsaldo, U=rp01203-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1075/le.17003.sze-
dc.identifier.hkuros315367-
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage89-
dc.identifier.epage119-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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