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Article: Mortality and suicide in schizophrenia: 21-year follow-up in rural China

TitleMortality and suicide in schizophrenia: 21-year follow-up in rural China
Authors
KeywordsSuicide
mortality
schizophrenia
China
predictive factors
Issue Date2020
PublisherCambridge University Press (CUP): Creative Commons. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bjpsych-open
Citation
BJPsych Open, 2020, v. 6 n. 6, p. article no. e121 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Little is known about the trend and predictors of 21-year mortality and suicide patterns in persons with schizophrenia. Aims: To explore the trend and predictors of 21-year mortality and suicide in persons with schizophrenia in rural China. Method: This longitudinal follow-up study included 510 persons with schizophrenia who were identified in a mental health survey of individuals (≥15 years old) in 1994 in six townships of Xinjin County, Chengdu, China, and followed up in three waves until 2015. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and Cox hazard regressions were conducted. Results: Of the 510 participants, 196 died (38.4% mortality) between 1994 and 2015; 13.8% of the deaths (n = 27) were due to suicide. Life expectancy was lower for men than for women (50.6 v. 58.5 years). Males consistently showed higher rates of mortality and suicide than females. Older participants had higher mortality (hazard ratio HR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.05) but lower suicide rates (HR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.93–0.98) than their younger counterparts. Poor family attitudes were associated with all-cause mortality and death due to other causes; no previous hospital admission and a history of suicide attempts independently predicted death by suicide. Conclusions: Our findings suggest there is a high mortality and suicide rate in persons with schizophrenia in rural China, with different predictive factors for mortality and suicide. It is important to develop culture-specific, demographically tailored and community-based mental healthcare and to strengthen family intervention to improve the long-term outcome of persons with schizophrenia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289336
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.286
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRan, M-
dc.contributor.authorXiao, Y-
dc.contributor.authorFazel, S-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLuo, W-
dc.contributor.authorHu, SH-
dc.contributor.authorYang, X-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, B-
dc.contributor.authorBrink, M-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SKW-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLW-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:11:12Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:11:12Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationBJPsych Open, 2020, v. 6 n. 6, p. article no. e121-
dc.identifier.issn2056-4724-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289336-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Little is known about the trend and predictors of 21-year mortality and suicide patterns in persons with schizophrenia. Aims: To explore the trend and predictors of 21-year mortality and suicide in persons with schizophrenia in rural China. Method: This longitudinal follow-up study included 510 persons with schizophrenia who were identified in a mental health survey of individuals (≥15 years old) in 1994 in six townships of Xinjin County, Chengdu, China, and followed up in three waves until 2015. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and Cox hazard regressions were conducted. Results: Of the 510 participants, 196 died (38.4% mortality) between 1994 and 2015; 13.8% of the deaths (n = 27) were due to suicide. Life expectancy was lower for men than for women (50.6 v. 58.5 years). Males consistently showed higher rates of mortality and suicide than females. Older participants had higher mortality (hazard ratio HR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.05) but lower suicide rates (HR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.93–0.98) than their younger counterparts. Poor family attitudes were associated with all-cause mortality and death due to other causes; no previous hospital admission and a history of suicide attempts independently predicted death by suicide. Conclusions: Our findings suggest there is a high mortality and suicide rate in persons with schizophrenia in rural China, with different predictive factors for mortality and suicide. It is important to develop culture-specific, demographically tailored and community-based mental healthcare and to strengthen family intervention to improve the long-term outcome of persons with schizophrenia.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press (CUP): Creative Commons. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bjpsych-open-
dc.relation.ispartofBJPsych Open-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectSuicide-
dc.subjectmortality-
dc.subjectschizophrenia-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectpredictive factors-
dc.titleMortality and suicide in schizophrenia: 21-year follow-up in rural China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailRan, M: msran@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, Y: yjinl@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SKW: kwsherry@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityRan, M=rp01788-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, Y=rp02581-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SKW=rp00539-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjo.2020.106-
dc.identifier.pmid33054894-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7576648-
dc.identifier.hkuros317516-
dc.identifier.volume6-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e121-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e121-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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