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Article: The geography of suicide in older adults in Hong Kong: An ecological study

TitleThe geography of suicide in older adults in Hong Kong: An ecological study
Authors
Keywordselderly suicide
Hong Kong
service provision
Social Vulnerability Index
Issue Date2020
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294
Citation
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2020, v. 35 n. 1, p. 99-112 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: The geography of suicide has been widely explored among the general population. However, little is known of the geographic variations in suicides among the older adults and their spatial correlates. This study aims to explore the spatial variations in the elderly suicide rates and their correlates in Hong Kong. Methods: Bayesian hierarchical models have been used to estimate smoothed standardized mortality ratios (2006‐2015) on suicide in people aged 65 years or older in each geographic unit in Hong Kong. Their associations with the Social Vulnerability Index and the accessibility of eight types of services (ie, recreational services, rehabilitation services, food services, daily necessity services, community services, and transportation services) were further analyzed. Results: The results suggested that compared with the simple “inner‐city high suicide rate and suburban low” pattern in the Western studies and the “central low suicide rate and peripheral high” pattern in the Asian studies, the spatial variations of elderly suicides in Hong Kong exhibit a much more complicated pattern. In Hong Kong, higher elderly suicide clusters were found in both the lower‐density areas located in the New Territories and in some inner‐city areas. The spatial variations of suicide in the older adults cannot be explained by the Social Vulnerability Index. Instead, service provision such as recreational services, daily necessity resources, and community centers played a more significant role in affecting suicides in the older adults. Conclusions: Strengthening public services, providing more public spaces and activities, and making good use of the community resources might be key and efficient strategies in elderly suicide prevention in Hong Kong.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289839
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.675
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.382

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChau, PH-
dc.contributor.authorChang, Q-
dc.contributor.authorWoo, J-
dc.contributor.authorWong, M-
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSF-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:18:12Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:18:12Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2020, v. 35 n. 1, p. 99-112-
dc.identifier.issn0885-6230-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289839-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The geography of suicide has been widely explored among the general population. However, little is known of the geographic variations in suicides among the older adults and their spatial correlates. This study aims to explore the spatial variations in the elderly suicide rates and their correlates in Hong Kong. Methods: Bayesian hierarchical models have been used to estimate smoothed standardized mortality ratios (2006‐2015) on suicide in people aged 65 years or older in each geographic unit in Hong Kong. Their associations with the Social Vulnerability Index and the accessibility of eight types of services (ie, recreational services, rehabilitation services, food services, daily necessity services, community services, and transportation services) were further analyzed. Results: The results suggested that compared with the simple “inner‐city high suicide rate and suburban low” pattern in the Western studies and the “central low suicide rate and peripheral high” pattern in the Asian studies, the spatial variations of elderly suicides in Hong Kong exhibit a much more complicated pattern. In Hong Kong, higher elderly suicide clusters were found in both the lower‐density areas located in the New Territories and in some inner‐city areas. The spatial variations of suicide in the older adults cannot be explained by the Social Vulnerability Index. Instead, service provision such as recreational services, daily necessity resources, and community centers played a more significant role in affecting suicides in the older adults. Conclusions: Strengthening public services, providing more public spaces and activities, and making good use of the community resources might be key and efficient strategies in elderly suicide prevention in Hong Kong.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectelderly suicide-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectservice provision-
dc.subjectSocial Vulnerability Index-
dc.titleThe geography of suicide in older adults in Hong Kong: An ecological study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailGuo, Y: yingqi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChau, PH: phpchau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, Q: cqs1988@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChau, PH=rp00574-
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/gps.5225-
dc.identifier.pmid31663178-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85075010218-
dc.identifier.hkuros317250-
dc.identifier.volume35-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage99-
dc.identifier.epage112-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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