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Article: Comparison of Repeated Video Display vs Combined Video Display and Live Demonstration as Training Methods to Healthcare Providers for Donning and Doffing Personal Protective Equipment: A Randomized Controlled Trial

TitleComparison of Repeated Video Display vs Combined Video Display and Live Demonstration as Training Methods to Healthcare Providers for Donning and Doffing Personal Protective Equipment: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Authors
KeywordsCOVID-19
coronavirus disease
personal protective equipment
training methods
Issue Date2020
PublisherDove Medical Press Ltd.(Dovepress). The Journal's web site is located at https://www.dovepress.com/risk-management-and-healthcare-policy-journal
Citation
Risk Management and Healthcare Policy, 2020, v. 13, p. 2325-2335 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: The lack of training in personal protective equipment (PPE) donning and doffing is hindering the current fight against the COVID-19 worldwide. In order to enable medical staff to learn how to don and doff PPE faster and more effectively, we compared two training methods of PPE donning and doffing. Methods: Participants in this study were 48 health care workers randomly divided into two groups. Group A watched a 10-minute demonstration (demo) video four times, while Group B watched the same 10-minute demo video twice and then watched a 10-minute live demo twice. The 40-minute learning time was the same for both groups. A 29-step examination was held after the training was completed. The examination scores of Groups A and B were recorded according to a checklist containing PPE donning and doffing steps . The time spent by the participants on PPE donning and doffing, their satisfaction with the training, and their confidence in donning and doffing PPE accurately were analyzed. Results: The average score of Group B was higher than that Group A, with a mean (SD) of 94.92 (1.72) vs 86.63 (6.34), respectively (P< 0.001). The average time spent by Group B was shorter than that spent by Group A, with a mean (SD) of 17.67 (1.01) vs 21.75 (1.82), respectively (P< 0.001). The satisfaction and confidence of Group B were higher than those of Group A (P< 0.001). Conclusion: Compared with repeated video display, combined video display and live demonstration are more suitable training methods for donning and doffing PPE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293522
ISSN
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.828
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y-
dc.contributor.authorZhong, M-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, H-
dc.contributor.authorWu, C-
dc.contributor.authorGao, X-
dc.contributor.authorXia, Z-
dc.contributor.authorMa, W-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-23T08:17:59Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-23T08:17:59Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationRisk Management and Healthcare Policy, 2020, v. 13, p. 2325-2335-
dc.identifier.issn1179-1594-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293522-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The lack of training in personal protective equipment (PPE) donning and doffing is hindering the current fight against the COVID-19 worldwide. In order to enable medical staff to learn how to don and doff PPE faster and more effectively, we compared two training methods of PPE donning and doffing. Methods: Participants in this study were 48 health care workers randomly divided into two groups. Group A watched a 10-minute demonstration (demo) video four times, while Group B watched the same 10-minute demo video twice and then watched a 10-minute live demo twice. The 40-minute learning time was the same for both groups. A 29-step examination was held after the training was completed. The examination scores of Groups A and B were recorded according to a checklist containing PPE donning and doffing steps . The time spent by the participants on PPE donning and doffing, their satisfaction with the training, and their confidence in donning and doffing PPE accurately were analyzed. Results: The average score of Group B was higher than that Group A, with a mean (SD) of 94.92 (1.72) vs 86.63 (6.34), respectively (P< 0.001). The average time spent by Group B was shorter than that spent by Group A, with a mean (SD) of 17.67 (1.01) vs 21.75 (1.82), respectively (P< 0.001). The satisfaction and confidence of Group B were higher than those of Group A (P< 0.001). Conclusion: Compared with repeated video display, combined video display and live demonstration are more suitable training methods for donning and doffing PPE.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherDove Medical Press Ltd.(Dovepress). The Journal's web site is located at https://www.dovepress.com/risk-management-and-healthcare-policy-journal-
dc.relation.ispartofRisk Management and Healthcare Policy-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectCOVID-19-
dc.subjectcoronavirus disease-
dc.subjectpersonal protective equipment-
dc.subjecttraining methods-
dc.titleComparison of Repeated Video Display vs Combined Video Display and Live Demonstration as Training Methods to Healthcare Providers for Donning and Doffing Personal Protective Equipment: A Randomized Controlled Trial-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXia, Z: zyxia@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityXia, Z=rp00532-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/RMHP.S267514-
dc.identifier.pmid33154684-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7605971-
dc.identifier.hkuros319741-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.spage2325-
dc.identifier.epage2335-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000588333700001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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