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Article: Evolutionary Dynamics of Sex Chromosomes of Paleognathous Birds

TitleEvolutionary Dynamics of Sex Chromosomes of Paleognathous Birds
Authors
Editors
Editor(s):Mank, J
Keywordssex chromosomes
genomics
molecular evolution
paleognaths
Issue Date2019
PublisherOxford University Press for Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. The Journal's web site is located at http://gbe.oxfordjournals.org
Citation
Genome Biology and Evolution, 2019, v. 11 n. 8, p. 2376-2390 How to Cite?
AbstractStandard models of sex chromosome evolution propose that recombination suppression leads to the degeneration of the heterogametic chromosome, as is seen for the Y chromosome in mammals and the W chromosome in most birds. Unlike other birds, paleognaths (ratites and tinamous) possess large nondegenerate regions on their sex chromosomes (PARs or pseudoautosomal regions). It remains unclear why these large PARs are retained over >100 Myr, and how this retention impacts the evolution of sex chromosomes within this system. To address this puzzle, we analyzed Z chromosome evolution and gene expression across 12 paleognaths, several of whose genomes have recently been sequenced. We confirm at the genomic level that most paleognaths retain large PARs. As in other birds, we find that all paleognaths have incomplete dosage compensation on the regions of the Z chromosome homologous to degenerated portions of the W (differentiated regions), but we find no evidence for enrichments of male-biased genes in PARs. We find limited evidence for increased evolutionary rates (faster-Z) either across the chromosome or in differentiated regions for most paleognaths with large PARs, but do recover signals of faster-Z evolution in tinamou species with mostly degenerated W chromosomes, similar to the pattern seen in neognaths. Unexpectedly, in some species, PAR-linked genes evolve faster on average than genes on autosomes, suggested by diverse genomic features to be due to reduced efficacy of selection in paleognath PARs. Our analysis shows that paleognath Z chromosomes are atypical at the genomic level, but the evolutionary forces maintaining largely homomorphic sex chromosomes in these species remain elusive.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293939
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.462
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.220
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, L-
dc.contributor.authorSin, SYW-
dc.contributor.authorGrayson, P-
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, SV-
dc.contributor.authorSackton, TB-
dc.contributor.editorMank, J-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-23T08:24:01Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-23T08:24:01Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationGenome Biology and Evolution, 2019, v. 11 n. 8, p. 2376-2390-
dc.identifier.issn1759-6653-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293939-
dc.description.abstractStandard models of sex chromosome evolution propose that recombination suppression leads to the degeneration of the heterogametic chromosome, as is seen for the Y chromosome in mammals and the W chromosome in most birds. Unlike other birds, paleognaths (ratites and tinamous) possess large nondegenerate regions on their sex chromosomes (PARs or pseudoautosomal regions). It remains unclear why these large PARs are retained over >100 Myr, and how this retention impacts the evolution of sex chromosomes within this system. To address this puzzle, we analyzed Z chromosome evolution and gene expression across 12 paleognaths, several of whose genomes have recently been sequenced. We confirm at the genomic level that most paleognaths retain large PARs. As in other birds, we find that all paleognaths have incomplete dosage compensation on the regions of the Z chromosome homologous to degenerated portions of the W (differentiated regions), but we find no evidence for enrichments of male-biased genes in PARs. We find limited evidence for increased evolutionary rates (faster-Z) either across the chromosome or in differentiated regions for most paleognaths with large PARs, but do recover signals of faster-Z evolution in tinamou species with mostly degenerated W chromosomes, similar to the pattern seen in neognaths. Unexpectedly, in some species, PAR-linked genes evolve faster on average than genes on autosomes, suggested by diverse genomic features to be due to reduced efficacy of selection in paleognath PARs. Our analysis shows that paleognath Z chromosomes are atypical at the genomic level, but the evolutionary forces maintaining largely homomorphic sex chromosomes in these species remain elusive.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press for Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. The Journal's web site is located at http://gbe.oxfordjournals.org-
dc.relation.ispartofGenome Biology and Evolution-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectsex chromosomes-
dc.subjectgenomics-
dc.subjectmolecular evolution-
dc.subjectpaleognaths-
dc.titleEvolutionary Dynamics of Sex Chromosomes of Paleognathous Birds-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSin, SYW: sinyw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySin, SYW=rp02377-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/gbe/evz154-
dc.identifier.pmid31329234-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6735826-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85071999516-
dc.identifier.hkuros319134-
dc.identifier.volume11-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage2376-
dc.identifier.epage2390-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000484266300025-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl1759-6653-

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