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Article: Seabed erosion and deposition related to the typhoon activity of the past millennium on the southeast coast of China

TitleSeabed erosion and deposition related to the typhoon activity of the past millennium on the southeast coast of China
Authors
Keywordssedimentary hiatus
erosion, typhoon
tsunami
the northern South China Sea
Issue Date2020
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/2388
Citation
Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 2020, v. 45 n. 8, p. 1695-1704 How to Cite?
AbstractCatastrophic events often interrupt long‐term Earth surface processes. In coastal areas, although millennial‐scale trends of climatic and sea‐level changes determine the trajectory of sedimentary landform evolution, storm and/or tsunami activity can cause abrupt changes in depositional conditions that may alter the long‐term sedimentary processes. Here, we report a sedimentary hiatus that is widely observed from the late Holocene sedimentary sequence at the seabed along the southeast China coast. This hiatus was discovered by close temporal sedimentary and radiocarbon dating analyses of a seabed sedimentary sequence in the mouth area of the Pearl River estuary. The results suggest that a couple of metres in the middle to late Holocene sediment at the seabed were eroded by a catastrophic event happening c. 1000–800 cal. Years BP. In theory, a mega‐tsunami generated from the Manila Trench could have caused such erosion at the seabed, but there is a lack of direct geological and historical evidence to support such a hypothesis. Much more likely, a super‐typhoon struck the coast and caused the erosion. This hypothesis is strongly supported by the region's historical and geological records, which suggest a period characteristic of intense typhoons ranging from the Medieval Warm Period to the climate transition phase (c. 1000–600 cal. Years BP). During the subsequent Little Ice Age, deposition of sandy sediment continued, suggesting frequent but weaker typhoon activity. Over the past two centuries the deposition of sandy sediment and gravels began, implying the beginning of a phase of intensifying typhoon conditions, possibly a result of the recent warming climate. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/294305
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.694
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.574
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXiong, H-
dc.contributor.authorZong, Y-
dc.contributor.authorHuang, G-
dc.contributor.authorFu, S-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-23T08:29:28Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-23T08:29:28Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationEarth Surface Processes and Landforms, 2020, v. 45 n. 8, p. 1695-1704-
dc.identifier.issn0197-9337-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/294305-
dc.description.abstractCatastrophic events often interrupt long‐term Earth surface processes. In coastal areas, although millennial‐scale trends of climatic and sea‐level changes determine the trajectory of sedimentary landform evolution, storm and/or tsunami activity can cause abrupt changes in depositional conditions that may alter the long‐term sedimentary processes. Here, we report a sedimentary hiatus that is widely observed from the late Holocene sedimentary sequence at the seabed along the southeast China coast. This hiatus was discovered by close temporal sedimentary and radiocarbon dating analyses of a seabed sedimentary sequence in the mouth area of the Pearl River estuary. The results suggest that a couple of metres in the middle to late Holocene sediment at the seabed were eroded by a catastrophic event happening c. 1000–800 cal. Years BP. In theory, a mega‐tsunami generated from the Manila Trench could have caused such erosion at the seabed, but there is a lack of direct geological and historical evidence to support such a hypothesis. Much more likely, a super‐typhoon struck the coast and caused the erosion. This hypothesis is strongly supported by the region's historical and geological records, which suggest a period characteristic of intense typhoons ranging from the Medieval Warm Period to the climate transition phase (c. 1000–600 cal. Years BP). During the subsequent Little Ice Age, deposition of sandy sediment continued, suggesting frequent but weaker typhoon activity. Over the past two centuries the deposition of sandy sediment and gravels began, implying the beginning of a phase of intensifying typhoon conditions, possibly a result of the recent warming climate. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/2388-
dc.relation.ispartofEarth Surface Processes and Landforms-
dc.subjectsedimentary hiatus-
dc.subjecterosion, typhoon-
dc.subjecttsunami-
dc.subjectthe northern South China Sea-
dc.titleSeabed erosion and deposition related to the typhoon activity of the past millennium on the southeast coast of China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXiong, H: xionghx@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZong, Y: yqzong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZong, Y=rp00846-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/esp.4839-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85086481677-
dc.identifier.hkuros318939-
dc.identifier.volume45-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage1695-
dc.identifier.epage1704-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000515407100001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl0197-9337-

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