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Article: Specificity, kinetics and longevity of antibody responses to avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infection in humans

TitleSpecificity, kinetics and longevity of antibody responses to avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infection in humans
Authors
KeywordsAntibody response
Clinical severity
Follow-up
Influenza A(H7N9)
Issue Date2020
PublisherWB Saunders Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jinf
Citation
Journal of Infection, 2020, v. 80 n. 3, p. 310-319 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: The long-term dynamics of antibody responses in patients with influenza A(H7N9) virus infection are not well understood. Methods: We conducted a longitudinal serological follow-up study in patients who were hospitalized with A(H7N9) virus infection, during 2013-2018. A(H7N9) virus-specific antibody responses were assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and neutralization (NT) assays. A random intercept model was used to fit a curve to HAI antibody responses over time. HAI antibody responses were compared by clinical severity. Results: Of 67 patients with A(H7N9) virus infection, HAI antibody titers reached 40 on average 11 days after illness onset and peaked at a titer of 290 after three months, and average titers of ≥80 and ≥40 were present until 11 months and 22 months respectively. HAI antibody responses were significantly higher in patients who experienced severe disease, including respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome, compared with patients who experienced less severe illness. Conclusions: Patients with A(H7N9) virus infection who survived severe disease mounted higher antibody responses that persisted for longer periods compared with those that experienced moderate disease. Studies of convalescent plasma treatment for A(H7N9) patients should consider collection of donor plasma from survivors of severe disease between 1 and 11 months after illness onset.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304525
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 6.072
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.946
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, J-
dc.contributor.authorZhu, H-
dc.contributor.authorHorby, PW-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Q-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, J-
dc.contributor.authorJiang, H-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, L-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, T-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChen, X-
dc.contributor.authorDeng, X-
dc.contributor.authorNikolay, B-
dc.contributor.authorWang, W-
dc.contributor.authorCauchemez, S-
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Y-
dc.contributor.authorUyeki, TM-
dc.contributor.authorYu, H-
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-23T09:01:16Z-
dc.date.available2021-09-23T09:01:16Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Infection, 2020, v. 80 n. 3, p. 310-319-
dc.identifier.issn0163-4453-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304525-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The long-term dynamics of antibody responses in patients with influenza A(H7N9) virus infection are not well understood. Methods: We conducted a longitudinal serological follow-up study in patients who were hospitalized with A(H7N9) virus infection, during 2013-2018. A(H7N9) virus-specific antibody responses were assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and neutralization (NT) assays. A random intercept model was used to fit a curve to HAI antibody responses over time. HAI antibody responses were compared by clinical severity. Results: Of 67 patients with A(H7N9) virus infection, HAI antibody titers reached 40 on average 11 days after illness onset and peaked at a titer of 290 after three months, and average titers of ≥80 and ≥40 were present until 11 months and 22 months respectively. HAI antibody responses were significantly higher in patients who experienced severe disease, including respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome, compared with patients who experienced less severe illness. Conclusions: Patients with A(H7N9) virus infection who survived severe disease mounted higher antibody responses that persisted for longer periods compared with those that experienced moderate disease. Studies of convalescent plasma treatment for A(H7N9) patients should consider collection of donor plasma from survivors of severe disease between 1 and 11 months after illness onset.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jinf-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Infection-
dc.subjectAntibody response-
dc.subjectClinical severity-
dc.subjectFollow-up-
dc.subjectInfluenza A(H7N9)-
dc.titleSpecificity, kinetics and longevity of antibody responses to avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infection in humans-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailZhu, H: zhuhch@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhu, H=rp01535-
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jinf.2019.11.024-
dc.identifier.pmid31954742-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7112568-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85078854195-
dc.identifier.hkuros325462-
dc.identifier.volume80-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage310-
dc.identifier.epage319-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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