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Conference Paper: Personality based on affective prosody: implications for speech therapy

TitlePersonality based on affective prosody: implications for speech therapy
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences - psychiatry and neurology
Issue Date2001
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=INS
Citation
The Twenty-Fourth Annual International Neuropsychological Society Mid-Year Conference, Brasilia, Brazil, 5-7 July 2001. Abstract in Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 2001, v. 7 n. 4, p. 422 How to Cite?
AbstractAffective prosody refers to the vocal quality of speech. In past research, it has been shown that patients with Parkinson’s disease have difficulty producing affective prosody in their speech, and subsequently, seen as passive and less intelligent by other people. The purpose of this study is to identify relevant sets of acoustic parameters, personality traits, and emotion types that would affect an individual’s attribution of personality towards other people. One hundred Chinese normal participants were asked to rate the personality of both male and female speakers after hearing a set of digital voice recordings (in Cantonese) developed in this study, as well as to indicate their willingness to help and whether they like each person (the speaker). Furthermore, the personality of each participant and speaker was also assessed using the short form of NEO–FFI (Chinese version). Each voice recording was manipulated in terms of Ekman & Friesen’s 6 universal emotions, and whether the recording was based on either a short sentence or just a single character. People’s personality attribution was affected by the difference between their own personality and that of the speaker, the emotional tone and linguistic composition of voice recordings, and the gender of both the speaker and the rater. The implications of these results are discussed in light of current speech therapy for patients with Parkinson’s disease and right-hemisphere brain damage.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42597
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.576
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.348

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYip, JTHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:27:21Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:27:21Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe Twenty-Fourth Annual International Neuropsychological Society Mid-Year Conference, Brasilia, Brazil, 5-7 July 2001. Abstract in Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 2001, v. 7 n. 4, p. 422en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1355-6177en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42597-
dc.description.abstractAffective prosody refers to the vocal quality of speech. In past research, it has been shown that patients with Parkinson’s disease have difficulty producing affective prosody in their speech, and subsequently, seen as passive and less intelligent by other people. The purpose of this study is to identify relevant sets of acoustic parameters, personality traits, and emotion types that would affect an individual’s attribution of personality towards other people. One hundred Chinese normal participants were asked to rate the personality of both male and female speakers after hearing a set of digital voice recordings (in Cantonese) developed in this study, as well as to indicate their willingness to help and whether they like each person (the speaker). Furthermore, the personality of each participant and speaker was also assessed using the short form of NEO–FFI (Chinese version). Each voice recording was manipulated in terms of Ekman & Friesen’s 6 universal emotions, and whether the recording was based on either a short sentence or just a single character. People’s personality attribution was affected by the difference between their own personality and that of the speaker, the emotional tone and linguistic composition of voice recordings, and the gender of both the speaker and the rater. The implications of these results are discussed in light of current speech therapy for patients with Parkinson’s disease and right-hemisphere brain damage.-
dc.format.extent21845 bytes-
dc.format.extent26112 bytes-
dc.format.extent71804 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=INSen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society-
dc.subjectMedical sciences - psychiatry and neurologyen_HK
dc.titlePersonality based on affective prosody: implications for speech therapyen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1355617701744104-
dc.identifier.hkuros63338-

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