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Article: Perceptions of Adolescents, Teachers and Parents of Life Skills Education and Life Skills in High School Students in Hong Kong

TitlePerceptions of Adolescents, Teachers and Parents of Life Skills Education and Life Skills in High School Students in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsLife skills
Psychosocial competencies
Adolescent well-being
Chinese adolescents
Hong Kong
Adolescent thriving
Issue Date2021
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht.
Citation
Applied Research in Quality of Life, 2021, v. 16 n. 5, p. 1847-1860 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough theories and research emphasize the importance of adolescent life skills, different stakeholders’ perceptions of the related issues have not been systematically investigated, particularly in Chinese contexts. This paper presents and integrates findings from four studies examining perceptions of different stakeholders on the need for and adequacy of life skills education and perceived adolescent life skills in Hong Kong. Data from four studies were used, including a longitudinal study with senior high school students (N = 3328+) and three cross-sectional studies based on students (N = 2474), teachers (N = 568) and parents (N = 431). Participants responded to mea- sures on their perceptions of the need for life skills education and adequacy of related education in the formal curriculum. They also rated adolescent life skills in different domains, including emotional competence, moral competence, resilience, problem-solving, life meaning, gratefulness, social competence, and integrity. Consistent across the four studies, while many stakeholders regarded life skills as important for adolescents, a majority of them also perceived life skills education as insufficient in the school curriculum. There were also views suggesting that adolescent life skills development was incomplete. Compared with teachers and parents, adolescents perceived higher levels of life skills in themselves and adolescents in Hong Kong. There is a strong perceived need to step up life skills education in adolescents, particularly in Hong .Kong
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/286361
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.078
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.545
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShek, DTL-
dc.contributor.authorLin, L-
dc.contributor.authorMa, CMS-
dc.contributor.authorYu, L-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, JTY-
dc.contributor.authorWu, FKY-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, H-
dc.contributor.authorDou, D-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-31T07:02:47Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-31T07:02:47Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationApplied Research in Quality of Life, 2021, v. 16 n. 5, p. 1847-1860-
dc.identifier.issn1871-2584-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/286361-
dc.description.abstractAlthough theories and research emphasize the importance of adolescent life skills, different stakeholders’ perceptions of the related issues have not been systematically investigated, particularly in Chinese contexts. This paper presents and integrates findings from four studies examining perceptions of different stakeholders on the need for and adequacy of life skills education and perceived adolescent life skills in Hong Kong. Data from four studies were used, including a longitudinal study with senior high school students (N = 3328+) and three cross-sectional studies based on students (N = 2474), teachers (N = 568) and parents (N = 431). Participants responded to mea- sures on their perceptions of the need for life skills education and adequacy of related education in the formal curriculum. They also rated adolescent life skills in different domains, including emotional competence, moral competence, resilience, problem-solving, life meaning, gratefulness, social competence, and integrity. Consistent across the four studies, while many stakeholders regarded life skills as important for adolescents, a majority of them also perceived life skills education as insufficient in the school curriculum. There were also views suggesting that adolescent life skills development was incomplete. Compared with teachers and parents, adolescents perceived higher levels of life skills in themselves and adolescents in Hong Kong. There is a strong perceived need to step up life skills education in adolescents, particularly in Hong .Kong-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht.-
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Research in Quality of Life-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectLife skills-
dc.subjectPsychosocial competencies-
dc.subjectAdolescent well-being-
dc.subjectChinese adolescents-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectAdolescent thriving-
dc.titlePerceptions of Adolescents, Teachers and Parents of Life Skills Education and Life Skills in High School Students in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWu, FKY: fkywu@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11482-020-09848-9-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85086441929-
dc.identifier.hkuros313109-
dc.identifier.volume16-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage1847-
dc.identifier.epage1860-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000539811900001-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-
dc.identifier.issnl1871-2576-

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