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Article: The Characteristics of Intelligence Profile and Eye Gaze in Facial Emotion Recognition in Mild and Moderate Preschoolers With Autism Spectrum Disorder

TitleThe Characteristics of Intelligence Profile and Eye Gaze in Facial Emotion Recognition in Mild and Moderate Preschoolers With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Authors
Keywordsautism spectrum disorder
mental development
emotion recognition
eye tracking
the Griffiths Mental Development Scales
Issue Date2019
PublisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.frontiersin.org/journals/psychiatry
Citation
Frontiers in Psychiatry, 2019, v. 10, p. article no. 402 How to Cite?
AbstractChildhood autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can easily be misdiagnosed, due to the nonspecific social and communicational deficits associated with the disorder. The present study attempted to profile the mental development and visual attention toward emotion among preschool children with mild or moderate ASD who were attending mainstream kindergartens. A total of 21 children (17 boys and 4 girls) diagnosed with mild or moderate ASD selected from 5,178 kindergarteners from the Xi’an city were recruited. Another group of 21 typically developing (TD) children who were matched with age, gender, and class served as controls. All children were assessed using the Griffiths Mental Development Scales–Chinese (GDS-C), and their social visual attention was assessed during watching 20 ecologically valid film scenes by using eye tracking technique. The results showed that ASD children had lower mental development scores in the Locomotor, Personal-Social, Language, Performance, and Practical Reasoning subscales than the TD peers. Moreover, deficits in recognizing emotions from facial expressions based on naturalistic scene stimuli with voice were found for ASD children. The deficits were significantly correlated with their ability in social interaction and development quotient in ASD group. ASD children showed atypical eye-gaze pattern when compared to TD children during facial emotion expression task. Children with ASD had reduced visual attention to facial emotion expression, especially for the eye region. The findings confirmed the deficits of ASD children in real life multimodal of emotion recognition, and their atypical eye-gaze pattern for emotion recognition. Parents and teachers of children with mild or moderate ASD should make informed educational decisions according to their level of mental development. In addition, eye tracking technique might clinically help provide evidence diagnosing children with mild or moderate ASD.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289302
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.157
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.919
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHe, Y-
dc.contributor.authorSu, Q-
dc.contributor.authorWang, L-
dc.contributor.authorHe, W-
dc.contributor.authorTan, C-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, H-
dc.contributor.authorNg, ML-
dc.contributor.authorYan, N-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Y-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:10:43Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:10:43Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Psychiatry, 2019, v. 10, p. article no. 402-
dc.identifier.issn1664-0640-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289302-
dc.description.abstractChildhood autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can easily be misdiagnosed, due to the nonspecific social and communicational deficits associated with the disorder. The present study attempted to profile the mental development and visual attention toward emotion among preschool children with mild or moderate ASD who were attending mainstream kindergartens. A total of 21 children (17 boys and 4 girls) diagnosed with mild or moderate ASD selected from 5,178 kindergarteners from the Xi’an city were recruited. Another group of 21 typically developing (TD) children who were matched with age, gender, and class served as controls. All children were assessed using the Griffiths Mental Development Scales–Chinese (GDS-C), and their social visual attention was assessed during watching 20 ecologically valid film scenes by using eye tracking technique. The results showed that ASD children had lower mental development scores in the Locomotor, Personal-Social, Language, Performance, and Practical Reasoning subscales than the TD peers. Moreover, deficits in recognizing emotions from facial expressions based on naturalistic scene stimuli with voice were found for ASD children. The deficits were significantly correlated with their ability in social interaction and development quotient in ASD group. ASD children showed atypical eye-gaze pattern when compared to TD children during facial emotion expression task. Children with ASD had reduced visual attention to facial emotion expression, especially for the eye region. The findings confirmed the deficits of ASD children in real life multimodal of emotion recognition, and their atypical eye-gaze pattern for emotion recognition. Parents and teachers of children with mild or moderate ASD should make informed educational decisions according to their level of mental development. In addition, eye tracking technique might clinically help provide evidence diagnosing children with mild or moderate ASD.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.frontiersin.org/journals/psychiatry-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Psychiatry-
dc.rightsThis Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. It is reproduced with permission.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectautism spectrum disorder-
dc.subjectmental development-
dc.subjectemotion recognition-
dc.subjecteye tracking-
dc.subjectthe Griffiths Mental Development Scales-
dc.titleThe Characteristics of Intelligence Profile and Eye Gaze in Facial Emotion Recognition in Mild and Moderate Preschoolers With Autism Spectrum Disorder-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailNg, ML: manwa@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, ML=rp00942-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyt.2019.00402-
dc.identifier.pmid31281268-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6596453-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85069471686-
dc.identifier.hkuros317171-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 402-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 402-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000472200600001-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-
dc.identifier.issnl1664-0640-

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