File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Swimming against the tide: Comparative lessons from government efforts to prohibit private supplementary tutoring delivered by regular teachers

TitleSwimming against the tide: Comparative lessons from government efforts to prohibit private supplementary tutoring delivered by regular teachers
Authors
Issue Date2020
Citation
Hungarian Educational Research Journal, 2020, v. 11 How to Cite?
AbstractPrivate supplementary tutoring, widely known as shadow education, has become a global phenomenon. It has a range of providers, including commercial companies, university students desiring extra pocket money, and regular school teachers who provide tutoring as a sideline activity. This paper focuses on the last category. Governments are commonly ambivalent about the existence of shadow education, and may especially disapprove of regular teachers providing private supplementary tutoring in part because they fear that the teachers will neglect their main duties. With such matters in mind, some governments have attempted to prohibit teachers from providing private tutoring. However, such prohibitions are difficult to implement. This paper analyses situations in Korea, Mauritius, Kenya and England in order to derive comparative lessons from experience. It demonstrates the importance of wider contextual factors including alignment of macro-level aspirations with the micro-level perspectives of families finding themselves in increasingly competitive environments.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/295914

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBray, TM-
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-08T08:15:49Z-
dc.date.available2021-02-08T08:15:49Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationHungarian Educational Research Journal, 2020, v. 11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/295914-
dc.description.abstractPrivate supplementary tutoring, widely known as shadow education, has become a global phenomenon. It has a range of providers, including commercial companies, university students desiring extra pocket money, and regular school teachers who provide tutoring as a sideline activity. This paper focuses on the last category. Governments are commonly ambivalent about the existence of shadow education, and may especially disapprove of regular teachers providing private supplementary tutoring in part because they fear that the teachers will neglect their main duties. With such matters in mind, some governments have attempted to prohibit teachers from providing private tutoring. However, such prohibitions are difficult to implement. This paper analyses situations in Korea, Mauritius, Kenya and England in order to derive comparative lessons from experience. It demonstrates the importance of wider contextual factors including alignment of macro-level aspirations with the micro-level perspectives of families finding themselves in increasingly competitive environments.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofHungarian Educational Research Journal-
dc.titleSwimming against the tide: Comparative lessons from government efforts to prohibit private supplementary tutoring delivered by regular teachers-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailBray, TM: mbray@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityBray, TM=rp00888-
dc.identifier.doi10.1556/063.2020.00031-
dc.identifier.hkuros321134-
dc.identifier.volume11-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats