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Article: Digital inequalities in health information seeking behaviors and experiences in the age of web 2.0: A population-based study in Hong Kong

TitleDigital inequalities in health information seeking behaviors and experiences in the age of web 2.0: A population-based study in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2021
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
PLoS One, 2021, v. 16, p. article no. e0249400 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Inequalities in health information seeking behaviors (HISBs) using mass media and internet websites (web 1.0) are well documented. Little is known about web 2.0 such as social networking sites (SNS) and instant messaging (IM) and experiences of HISBs. Methods: We surveyed representative Hong Kong Chinese adults (N = 10143, 54.9% female; 72.3% aged 25–64 years) on frequency of HISBs using traditional sources, internet websites, SNS (e.g., Facebook, Twitter), and IM (e.g., WhatsApp, WeChat) and experiences measured using Information Seeking Experience Scale. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) for HISBs and experiences by sociodemographic and health-related characteristics were yielded using multivariable Poisson regression with robust variance estimators. aPRs for experiences by HISBs using internet websites, SNS, and IM adjusting for sociodemographic and health-related characteristics were also yielded. Results: Being female, higher educational attainment, not smoking, and being physically active were associated with HISBs using any source (all P<0.05). Older age had decreased aPRs for HISBs using traditional sources (P for trend = 0.03), internet websites (P for trend<0.001), and SNS (P for trend<0.001) but not for IM (aged 45–64 years: aPR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.07, 2.03). Lower educational attainment and income were associated with negative experiences including feelings of effort and difficulties in understanding the information (all P for trend<0.05). Older age had increased aPRs for difficulties in understanding the information (P for trend = 0.003). Compared with internet websites, HISBs using IM was associated with feelings of frustration (aPR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.08, 1.79), difficulties in understanding the information (aPR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.12, 1.65), and quality concern (aPR = 1.20, 95% CI 1.08, 1.32). Conclusions: We identified correlates of web-based health information seeking and experiences in Hong Kong Chinese adults. Providing greater access to and improved information environment of web 2.0 to the target groups may help address digital inequalities.
Descriptioneid_2-s2.0-85103558975
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/298736
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.74
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGUO, N-
dc.contributor.authorGUO, Z-
dc.contributor.authorZHAO, S-
dc.contributor.authorHo, SY-
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT-
dc.contributor.authorLai, AYK-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSC-
dc.contributor.authorWang, MP-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-12T03:02:41Z-
dc.date.available2021-04-12T03:02:41Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2021, v. 16, p. article no. e0249400-
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/298736-
dc.descriptioneid_2-s2.0-85103558975-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Inequalities in health information seeking behaviors (HISBs) using mass media and internet websites (web 1.0) are well documented. Little is known about web 2.0 such as social networking sites (SNS) and instant messaging (IM) and experiences of HISBs. Methods: We surveyed representative Hong Kong Chinese adults (N = 10143, 54.9% female; 72.3% aged 25–64 years) on frequency of HISBs using traditional sources, internet websites, SNS (e.g., Facebook, Twitter), and IM (e.g., WhatsApp, WeChat) and experiences measured using Information Seeking Experience Scale. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) for HISBs and experiences by sociodemographic and health-related characteristics were yielded using multivariable Poisson regression with robust variance estimators. aPRs for experiences by HISBs using internet websites, SNS, and IM adjusting for sociodemographic and health-related characteristics were also yielded. Results: Being female, higher educational attainment, not smoking, and being physically active were associated with HISBs using any source (all P<0.05). Older age had decreased aPRs for HISBs using traditional sources (P for trend = 0.03), internet websites (P for trend<0.001), and SNS (P for trend<0.001) but not for IM (aged 45–64 years: aPR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.07, 2.03). Lower educational attainment and income were associated with negative experiences including feelings of effort and difficulties in understanding the information (all P for trend<0.05). Older age had increased aPRs for difficulties in understanding the information (P for trend = 0.003). Compared with internet websites, HISBs using IM was associated with feelings of frustration (aPR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.08, 1.79), difficulties in understanding the information (aPR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.12, 1.65), and quality concern (aPR = 1.20, 95% CI 1.08, 1.32). Conclusions: We identified correlates of web-based health information seeking and experiences in Hong Kong Chinese adults. Providing greater access to and improved information environment of web 2.0 to the target groups may help address digital inequalities.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS One-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleDigital inequalities in health information seeking behaviors and experiences in the age of web 2.0: A population-based study in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY: syho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLai, AYK: agneslai@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SSC: scsophia@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWang, MP: mpwang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427-
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253-
dc.identifier.authorityLai, AYK=rp02579-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SSC=rp00423-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, MP=rp01863-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0249400-
dc.identifier.pmid33784362-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC8009409-
dc.identifier.hkuros322163-
dc.identifier.volume16-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e0249400-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e0249400-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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