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Article: Irradiation methods of 10,600 nm carbon dioxide laser for dental caries prevention

TitleIrradiation methods of 10,600 nm carbon dioxide laser for dental caries prevention
Authors
KeywordsCaries prevention
Carbon dioxide laser
10,600 nm laser
Irradiation methods
Issue Date2021
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/dentistry/journal/41547
Citation
Lasers in Dental Science, 2021, v. 5, p. 1-8 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To investigate the parameters and irradiation techniques used for 10,600 nm carbon dioxide laser for dental caries prevention. Methods: This study examined the 22 publications on the effects of carbon dioxide lasers on preventing caries. The parameters investigated were output power, pulse energy, frequency (for pulse laser), spot area and fluence. The techniques investigated were the mode (fixed spot or scanning motion), time and irradiation distance. Results: Seventeen studies examined the prevention of enamel caries. The output power, pulse energy, frequency, spot area and fluence were determined, and their ranges were 0.1 to 2800 W, 0.0025 to 2000 mJ, 8.7 × 10−8 to 0.05 cm2 , 1 to 226 Hz and 0.3 to 28.6 Jcm−2 , respectively. Ten studies employed scanning motion and seven employed fixed spot irradiation. The time and irradiation distance ranged from 2 to 9 s and 1 to 370 mm, respectively. Six studies examined dentin caries prevention. The output power, pulse energy, frequency, spot area and fluence ranged from 0.17 to 480 W, 1.7 to 540 mJ, 0.008 to 0.05 cm2 , 1 to 250 Hz and 0.05 to 715 Jcm−2 , respectively. Three studies employed spot irradiation and three employed scanning motion. The time and irradiation distance range from 4 to 15 s and 5 to 198 mm, respectively. Parameters of three studies were incorrect and two studies could not be determined. Conclusion: This review found considerable variations in the included articles’ parameters and irradiation techniques reported for 10,600 nm carbon dioxide laser for caries prevention. Some studies did not provide adequate information on the parameters and the irradiation technique. A few studies reported incorrect parameters or impractical irradiation distance for clinical practice.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/298797
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuk, K-
dc.contributor.authorZhao, IS-
dc.contributor.authorYin, IX-
dc.contributor.authorNiu, JY-
dc.contributor.authorGutknecht, N-
dc.contributor.authorChu, CH-
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-12T03:03:30Z-
dc.date.available2021-04-12T03:03:30Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationLasers in Dental Science, 2021, v. 5, p. 1-8-
dc.identifier.issn2367-2587-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/298797-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate the parameters and irradiation techniques used for 10,600 nm carbon dioxide laser for dental caries prevention. Methods: This study examined the 22 publications on the effects of carbon dioxide lasers on preventing caries. The parameters investigated were output power, pulse energy, frequency (for pulse laser), spot area and fluence. The techniques investigated were the mode (fixed spot or scanning motion), time and irradiation distance. Results: Seventeen studies examined the prevention of enamel caries. The output power, pulse energy, frequency, spot area and fluence were determined, and their ranges were 0.1 to 2800 W, 0.0025 to 2000 mJ, 8.7 × 10−8 to 0.05 cm2 , 1 to 226 Hz and 0.3 to 28.6 Jcm−2 , respectively. Ten studies employed scanning motion and seven employed fixed spot irradiation. The time and irradiation distance ranged from 2 to 9 s and 1 to 370 mm, respectively. Six studies examined dentin caries prevention. The output power, pulse energy, frequency, spot area and fluence ranged from 0.17 to 480 W, 1.7 to 540 mJ, 0.008 to 0.05 cm2 , 1 to 250 Hz and 0.05 to 715 Jcm−2 , respectively. Three studies employed spot irradiation and three employed scanning motion. The time and irradiation distance range from 4 to 15 s and 5 to 198 mm, respectively. Parameters of three studies were incorrect and two studies could not be determined. Conclusion: This review found considerable variations in the included articles’ parameters and irradiation techniques reported for 10,600 nm carbon dioxide laser for caries prevention. Some studies did not provide adequate information on the parameters and the irradiation technique. A few studies reported incorrect parameters or impractical irradiation distance for clinical practice.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/dentistry/journal/41547-
dc.relation.ispartofLasers in Dental Science-
dc.subjectCaries prevention-
dc.subjectCarbon dioxide laser-
dc.subject10,600 nm laser-
dc.subjectIrradiation methods-
dc.titleIrradiation methods of 10,600 nm carbon dioxide laser for dental caries prevention-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYin, IX: irisxyin@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChu, CH: chchu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChu, CH=rp00022-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s41547-021-00114-1-
dc.identifier.hkuros322032-
dc.identifier.volume5-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage8-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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