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Article: Epidemiological and Clinical Characteristics of Human Hepegivirus 1 Infection in Patients With Hepatitis C

TitleEpidemiological and Clinical Characteristics of Human Hepegivirus 1 Infection in Patients With Hepatitis C
Authors
Keywordshepatitis C virus
human hepegivirus 1
hepatitis
Issue Date2019
PublisherOxford University Press (OUP): Policy C. The Journal's web site is located at http://ofid.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Open Forum Infectious Diseases, 2019, v. 6 n. 8, p. article no. ofz329 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Transmission of human hepegivirus 1 (HHpgV-1), a novel human pegivirus, is closely associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The impact of HHpgV-1 viremia on HCV infection is unknown. This study aimed to (a) evaluate the impact of HHpgV-1 viremia on HCV viral load and liver injury and (b) elucidate the clinical and molecular epidemiology of HHpgV-1 infection. Methods: Individuals with HHpgV-1 viremia (cases) were identified by screening plasma from 655 HCV-infected adults. HHpgV-1 isolates were sequenced for phylogenetic analysis, and viral load was quantified. Cases were age- and sex-matched to HCV-infected individuals without HHpgV-1 viremia (controls) in a 1:3 ratio. A retrospective case–control analysis was performed to identify differences in HCV viral load and parameters of liver injury. Results: Among HCV-infected adults, 16/655 (2.4%) had HHpgV-1 viremia. Risk groups for HHpgV-1 infection included intravenous drug users, blood product recipients, tattoo recipients, and men who have sex with men. Viral sequences clustered into 2 distinct HHpgV-1 genogroups. Cases had a higher mean HCV viral load than controls, with difference between means of 0.58 log10 IU/mL (P = .009). Cases were more likely to have an HCV viral load >5 log10 IU/mL (P = .028). Multiple regression demonstrated the impact of HHpgV-1 viral load and infection status on HCV viral load. HHpgV-1 infection was not associated with higher liver function tests, fibrosis scores, or imaging abnormalities. Conclusions: HHpgV-1 viremia is associated with a higher HCV viral load in co-infected patients. HHpgV-1 infection does not affect progression of HCV-related liver disease.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284102
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.656

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSridhar, S-
dc.contributor.authorYip, CCY-
dc.contributor.authorChew, NFS-
dc.contributor.authorWu, S-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KH-
dc.contributor.authorChan, JFW-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, VCC-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY-
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-20T05:56:06Z-
dc.date.available2020-07-20T05:56:06Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationOpen Forum Infectious Diseases, 2019, v. 6 n. 8, p. article no. ofz329-
dc.identifier.issn2328-8957-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284102-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Transmission of human hepegivirus 1 (HHpgV-1), a novel human pegivirus, is closely associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The impact of HHpgV-1 viremia on HCV infection is unknown. This study aimed to (a) evaluate the impact of HHpgV-1 viremia on HCV viral load and liver injury and (b) elucidate the clinical and molecular epidemiology of HHpgV-1 infection. Methods: Individuals with HHpgV-1 viremia (cases) were identified by screening plasma from 655 HCV-infected adults. HHpgV-1 isolates were sequenced for phylogenetic analysis, and viral load was quantified. Cases were age- and sex-matched to HCV-infected individuals without HHpgV-1 viremia (controls) in a 1:3 ratio. A retrospective case–control analysis was performed to identify differences in HCV viral load and parameters of liver injury. Results: Among HCV-infected adults, 16/655 (2.4%) had HHpgV-1 viremia. Risk groups for HHpgV-1 infection included intravenous drug users, blood product recipients, tattoo recipients, and men who have sex with men. Viral sequences clustered into 2 distinct HHpgV-1 genogroups. Cases had a higher mean HCV viral load than controls, with difference between means of 0.58 log10 IU/mL (P = .009). Cases were more likely to have an HCV viral load >5 log10 IU/mL (P = .028). Multiple regression demonstrated the impact of HHpgV-1 viral load and infection status on HCV viral load. HHpgV-1 infection was not associated with higher liver function tests, fibrosis scores, or imaging abnormalities. Conclusions: HHpgV-1 viremia is associated with a higher HCV viral load in co-infected patients. HHpgV-1 infection does not affect progression of HCV-related liver disease.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP): Policy C. The Journal's web site is located at http://ofid.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofOpen Forum Infectious Diseases-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjecthepatitis C virus-
dc.subjecthuman hepegivirus 1-
dc.subjecthepatitis-
dc.titleEpidemiological and Clinical Characteristics of Human Hepegivirus 1 Infection in Patients With Hepatitis C-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSridhar, S: sid8998@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYip, CCY: yipcyril@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChew, NFS: chewnf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWu, S: wss2017@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KH: khl17@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, JFW: jfwchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, VCC: vcccheng@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySridhar, S=rp02249-
dc.identifier.authorityYip, CCY=rp01721-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, JFW=rp01736-
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ofid/ofz329-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85081760397-
dc.identifier.hkuros310966-
dc.identifier.volume6-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. ofz329-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. ofz329-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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