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Article: Mental health crisis under COVID-19 pandemic in Hong Kong, China

TitleMental health crisis under COVID-19 pandemic in Hong Kong, China
Authors
KeywordsCOVID-19
Mental health
Stress
Anxiety
Depression symptom
Issue Date2020
PublisherElsevier - Open Access. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijid
Citation
International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2020, v. 100, p. 431-433 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To compare the mental health burden before and during the COVID-19 outbreak and identify the vulnerable groups by sociodemographic factors. Methods: We analyzed repeated cross-sectional data from the Hong Kong Family and Health Information Trend Survey (FHInTS) in 2016 (N = 4036) and 2017 (N = 4051) and the COVID-19 Health Information Survey (CoVHInS) in April 9–23, 2020 (N = 1501) using population-based random samples of general adults by landline telephone and online panel. Stress (Perceived Stress Scale 4), anxiety symptoms (General Anxiety Disorders 2), depression symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-2), subjective happiness (4-point Likert item), and sociodemographic factors were collected. Results: Compared with 2016 and 2017, the stress level increased by 28.3%, prevalence of anxiety increased by 42.3%, and the depression symptoms and unhappiness have doubled (all P for trends <0.001) during the COVID-19 outbreak. The increases in stress levels were significantly larger among older and less educated respondents (P for interactions <0.001). Conclusion: Hong Kong had a mental health emergency even with no lockdown and well-managed outbreaks. Older and under-privileged people will suffer most. Public mental health interventions are urgently needed particularly for the older adults and individuals with primary or lower education attainment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287243
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.202
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.148
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZHAO, SZ-
dc.contributor.authorWong, JYH-
dc.contributor.authorLuk, TT-
dc.contributor.authorWai, AKC-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.contributor.authorWang, MP-
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-22T02:58:01Z-
dc.date.available2020-09-22T02:58:01Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2020, v. 100, p. 431-433-
dc.identifier.issn1201-9712-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287243-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To compare the mental health burden before and during the COVID-19 outbreak and identify the vulnerable groups by sociodemographic factors. Methods: We analyzed repeated cross-sectional data from the Hong Kong Family and Health Information Trend Survey (FHInTS) in 2016 (N = 4036) and 2017 (N = 4051) and the COVID-19 Health Information Survey (CoVHInS) in April 9–23, 2020 (N = 1501) using population-based random samples of general adults by landline telephone and online panel. Stress (Perceived Stress Scale 4), anxiety symptoms (General Anxiety Disorders 2), depression symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-2), subjective happiness (4-point Likert item), and sociodemographic factors were collected. Results: Compared with 2016 and 2017, the stress level increased by 28.3%, prevalence of anxiety increased by 42.3%, and the depression symptoms and unhappiness have doubled (all P for trends <0.001) during the COVID-19 outbreak. The increases in stress levels were significantly larger among older and less educated respondents (P for interactions <0.001). Conclusion: Hong Kong had a mental health emergency even with no lockdown and well-managed outbreaks. Older and under-privileged people will suffer most. Public mental health interventions are urgently needed particularly for the older adults and individuals with primary or lower education attainment.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier - Open Access. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijid-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Infectious Diseases-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectCOVID-19-
dc.subjectMental health-
dc.subjectStress-
dc.subjectAnxiety-
dc.subjectDepression symptom-
dc.titleMental health crisis under COVID-19 pandemic in Hong Kong, China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, JYH: janetyh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLuk, TT: lukkevin@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWai, AKC: awai@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWang, MP: mpwang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, JYH=rp01561-
dc.identifier.authorityWai, AKC=rp02261-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, MP=rp01863-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijid.2020.09.030-
dc.identifier.pmid32947051-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7492140-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85092523868-
dc.identifier.hkuros314582-
dc.identifier.volume100-
dc.identifier.spage431-
dc.identifier.epage433-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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