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Article: Preferred problem solving and decision-making role in fertility treatment among women following an unsuccessful in vitro fertilization cycle

TitlePreferred problem solving and decision-making role in fertility treatment among women following an unsuccessful in vitro fertilization cycle
Authors
KeywordsProblem solving
Decision-making
IVF
Patient-centred care
Spousal relationship
Issue Date2019
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcwomenshealth/
Citation
BMC Women's Health, 2019, v. 19 n. 1, p. article no. 153 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: While the literature on healthcare decision-making has long focused on doctor-patient interaction, fertility treatment is an exception, characterized by a triangular interplay between the doctor, the woman and her partner. This study examined treatment decision-making preferences of women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment, following an unsuccessful IVF cycle, especially their preferred level of doctor and spousal involvement. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 246 Chinese women undergoing IVF recruited from an assisted reproduction clinic of a university-affiliated hospital in Hong Kong. Data collection was conducted between January 2014 and August 2015. Results: Most participants preferred sharing the decision-making tasks with their doctors (92%). In the doctor-patient relationship, passive roles were associated with higher marital satisfaction, presence of religious affiliation and secondary infertility, while autonomous roles were related to female-factor infertility. Fifty-two percent of participants anticipated sharing decision-making, while 46% preferred handing over the decision to their husbands. Preference for a passive rather than a shared role in the spousal relationship was related to a higher husband’s age, greater marital satisfaction and higher anxiety. Conclusions: In brief, women tended to prefer sharing decision-making tasks with their doctor as well as actively engaging their partner in making decisions about fertility treatment. This study adds to our understanding of women’s role preference and level of involvement in infertility treatment decision-making by providing quantitative evidence from women’s experience. It highlights the importance of healthcare professionals in facilitating shared decision-making among couples.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/294161
ISSN
2018 Impact Factor: 1.592
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.746
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, CHY-
dc.contributor.authorLau, BHP-
dc.contributor.authorTam, MYJ-
dc.contributor.authorNg, EHY-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-23T08:27:14Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-23T08:27:14Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Women's Health, 2019, v. 19 n. 1, p. article no. 153-
dc.identifier.issn1472-6874-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/294161-
dc.description.abstractBackground: While the literature on healthcare decision-making has long focused on doctor-patient interaction, fertility treatment is an exception, characterized by a triangular interplay between the doctor, the woman and her partner. This study examined treatment decision-making preferences of women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment, following an unsuccessful IVF cycle, especially their preferred level of doctor and spousal involvement. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 246 Chinese women undergoing IVF recruited from an assisted reproduction clinic of a university-affiliated hospital in Hong Kong. Data collection was conducted between January 2014 and August 2015. Results: Most participants preferred sharing the decision-making tasks with their doctors (92%). In the doctor-patient relationship, passive roles were associated with higher marital satisfaction, presence of religious affiliation and secondary infertility, while autonomous roles were related to female-factor infertility. Fifty-two percent of participants anticipated sharing decision-making, while 46% preferred handing over the decision to their husbands. Preference for a passive rather than a shared role in the spousal relationship was related to a higher husband’s age, greater marital satisfaction and higher anxiety. Conclusions: In brief, women tended to prefer sharing decision-making tasks with their doctor as well as actively engaging their partner in making decisions about fertility treatment. This study adds to our understanding of women’s role preference and level of involvement in infertility treatment decision-making by providing quantitative evidence from women’s experience. It highlights the importance of healthcare professionals in facilitating shared decision-making among couples.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcwomenshealth/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Women's Health-
dc.rightsBMC Women's Health. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectProblem solving-
dc.subjectDecision-making-
dc.subjectIVF-
dc.subjectPatient-centred care-
dc.subjectSpousal relationship-
dc.titlePreferred problem solving and decision-making role in fertility treatment among women following an unsuccessful in vitro fertilization cycle-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, CHY: chancelia@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, BHP: hpbl@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailNg, EHY: nghye@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CHY=rp00498-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, BHP=rp02055-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, EHY=rp00426-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12905-019-0856-5-
dc.identifier.pmid31805920-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6896772-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85076175257-
dc.identifier.hkuros319336-
dc.identifier.volume19-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 153-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 153-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000511360800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl1472-6874-

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