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Article: 3‐Dimensional simulations and student learning in orthodontic education

Title3‐Dimensional simulations and student learning in orthodontic education
Authors
Issue Date2021
PublisherWiley. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1600-0579
Citation
European Journal of Dental Education, 2021 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction The electronic dental model (e-model) is an example of a digital 3-Dimensional technology to support inquiry-based learning in undergraduate dental education. As student perceptions of and engagement with e-models vary, it is uncertain whether these perceptions have implications for their learning processes and outcomes. Methods Third-year dental students (N=40) completed a questionnaire to identify their perceptions of and preferences for model modalities. They were divided into three groups based on their preference: Preferring plaster models(Group 1); Preferring e-models(Group 2); No preference(Group 3). Students from three groups (N=9) attended a hands-on digital occlusion evaluation workshop, and then completed a case-based diagnostic evaluation test using digital occlusion evaluation software. Camtasia Studio™ recorded real-time and on-screen data of the number of mouse-clicks and time spent. Results Students reported positive feedbacks on the use of e-models, and 72.5% of the students preferred combination use of e-models and plaster models. After attending the hands-on digital dental occlusion evaluation workshop, Group 2 scored higher on the diagnostic evaluation test (p<0.05) and registered more mouse-clicks than Group 1 when evaluating the arch symmetry (p<0.05). Group 2 registered fewer mouse-clicks than Group 3during tooth size measurement (p<0.05). There was no significant difference regarding the time used to answer the knowledge questions among the three groups. Conclusion Undergraduate dental students indicated a generally high acceptance of e-models for their learning in orthodontics, and more prefer a blended approach. Students preferring e-models presented higher performance outcomes, which supports cognitive load theory regarding prior exposure to simulation-based environments.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304926
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, CY-
dc.contributor.authorLiao, CS-
dc.contributor.authorLu, JJ-
dc.contributor.authorShan, ZY-
dc.contributor.authorGu, M-
dc.contributor.authorBridges, SM-
dc.contributor.authorYang, Y-
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-05T02:37:13Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-05T02:37:13Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Dental Education, 2021-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304926-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction The electronic dental model (e-model) is an example of a digital 3-Dimensional technology to support inquiry-based learning in undergraduate dental education. As student perceptions of and engagement with e-models vary, it is uncertain whether these perceptions have implications for their learning processes and outcomes. Methods Third-year dental students (N=40) completed a questionnaire to identify their perceptions of and preferences for model modalities. They were divided into three groups based on their preference: Preferring plaster models(Group 1); Preferring e-models(Group 2); No preference(Group 3). Students from three groups (N=9) attended a hands-on digital occlusion evaluation workshop, and then completed a case-based diagnostic evaluation test using digital occlusion evaluation software. Camtasia Studio™ recorded real-time and on-screen data of the number of mouse-clicks and time spent. Results Students reported positive feedbacks on the use of e-models, and 72.5% of the students preferred combination use of e-models and plaster models. After attending the hands-on digital dental occlusion evaluation workshop, Group 2 scored higher on the diagnostic evaluation test (p<0.05) and registered more mouse-clicks than Group 1 when evaluating the arch symmetry (p<0.05). Group 2 registered fewer mouse-clicks than Group 3during tooth size measurement (p<0.05). There was no significant difference regarding the time used to answer the knowledge questions among the three groups. Conclusion Undergraduate dental students indicated a generally high acceptance of e-models for their learning in orthodontics, and more prefer a blended approach. Students preferring e-models presented higher performance outcomes, which supports cognitive load theory regarding prior exposure to simulation-based environments.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1600-0579-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Dental Education-
dc.rightsSubmitted (preprint) Version This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Accepted (peer-reviewed) Version This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.title3‐Dimensional simulations and student learning in orthodontic education-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailGu, M: drgumin@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailBridges, SM: sbridges@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYang, Y: yangyanq@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityGu, M=rp01892-
dc.identifier.authorityBridges, SM=rp00048-
dc.identifier.authorityYang, Y=rp00045-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/eje.12718-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85116098731-
dc.identifier.hkuros325906-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000703075400001-

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